Samsung Galaxy S9 Gets June Security Patch on Unlocked and Carrier Units

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Jun 25, 2018
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After its release earlier this year, the carrier-unlocked variants of the Samsung Galaxy S9 in the US haven’t received a single security update. Their carrier-locked counterparts didn’t fare better, either, with most of them receiving delayed or no updates. On the other hand, international variants of the device have been receiving regular updates, which makes us wonder, why the delay for the US variants in particular.

Thankfully, the carrier-unlocked Galaxy S9 and S9+ have begun receiving the June security update, which was first spotted by Droid-Life. Additionally, some users on the Verizon and T-Mobile network also have received the June security patch, according to the same report. That leaves only AT&T and Sprint, who should hopefully roll it out soon. It is also worth noting that AT&T is yet to roll out a single OTA for the flagships, ever since its release three months ago.

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The actual update weighs in at about 700MB, largely due to the numerous bugfixes it has. The Galaxy S9 and S9+ have had their share of bugs since its release including major ones such as degraded call quality and dead-zones in the touchscreen. The call quality issue was a thorn in Samsung’s side, as it took them several OTA updates to fix it and even resulted in them getting sued in Israel. 

The build number for the S9 and S9+ is G960U1UES2ARF4 and G965U1UES2ARF4 respectively. The update is live right now, so head into Settings>System update to grab it. Hopefully, we don’t have to wait three more months for another update this time around. Unlocked devices in the US seem to be one of the last to get updates, as was observed with the Oreo rollout today. Samsung cites that it takes more time because they’ve got to be tested across all networks. That might hold true for manor OS updates, but surely, a monthly security patch shouldn’t be that hard.

Source: 9to5google

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