In the First 48 Hours of Availability, 200,000 People Signed Up For Apple News+

Apr 3
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Apple’s big services-oriented event took place in March and one of the biggest announcements to take the stage was the company’s Apple News+. Now, it has been discovered that more than 200,000 people had signed up for the service in its first 48 hours of availability. The news comes from the New York Times and there were two sources that spoke to the publication. Let’s dive in to see some more details on the matter.

Over 200,000 People Signed Up For Apple News+ In Only 48 Hours of Availability

Apple News+ will be available to all users at $9.99 per month with the first month being free for all who opt for it. To be fair, Apple News+ is better in numbers than that of Texture – an app on which Apple’s News service is now based on. The service was acquired last year when it was at its peak. However, 200,000 does not seem like a gigantic number in contrast to the number of iOS and macOS devices that are active.

Related Apple News+ Is Apple’s Latest Paid Subscription Program and Integrates Traditional Magazines for Your Reading Pleasure

The marketing event seems to have accomplished its goal. More than 200,000 people subscribed to Apple News Plus in its first 48 hours — more than Texture had amassed at its peak, according to two people with knowledge of the figures who asked not to be named to discuss confidential information.

Furthermore, it is yet to be seen if the company will retain these numbers. This means that it will be interesting to see how many of these subscribers will cancel their plan before the payment actually starts. The news subscription service features more than 300 magazines along with content from news sources like The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times and more.

There will be more to the story, so be sure to stay tuned in for more details on the matter. What do you think about the Apple New+? Do you think $9.99 is a little too much for a news subscription service? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Source: The New York Times

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