Surface Pro 3 and Galaxy Note 4 Beat iPad Air 2 & iPhone 6 in Color Accuracy Test

Shaikh Rafia
Posted 2 years ago

In the current era where online shopping has become an important part of our conveniently chosen lives, it is essential to have displays that could deliver accurate colors. While this has to do a lot with both the photography and photoshopping, display devices play an important part in the equation. Apple’s latest product series including iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, and the iPhone 6 duo keeps a distinctive place when it comes to the display technology. However, are they really leading the game when it comes delivering accurate colors?

Apple loses in color accuracy tests:

The latest color accuracy test has been conducted by the folks at DisplayMate who had already run some preliminary tests on the latest Apple products. Today comes more detailed color accuracy test results run on the six best mobile displays. The test includes iPad Air 2, iPhone 6 Plus, Samsung Galaxy Note 4, Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5, Microsoft Surface Pro 3, and Amazon Kindle HDX 8.9.


The color accuracy test for mobile displays was ranked in five different categories that included full gamut color accuracy, skin tone accuracy, organic color accuracy, blue region and white point color accuracy. Having visible lead in different categories, Samsung’s Galaxy Note 4 took the top position followed by Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.5. Apple’s two products, iPad Air 2 and the iPhone 6 Plus ranked highest in skin tone color accuracy and the organic color accuracy tests; coming at the very end of the line in the overall results. DisplayMate gives some details;

Its seems likely that Apple has concentrated on the important Red to Green part of the Color Space, which includes both the Skin Tone and Organic Colors. On the other hand, both the iPhone 6 Plus and iPad Air 2 are in last place for the Full Gamut Color Accuracy. This is partly the result of an over saturated Blue primary that distorts almost the entire Blue Region, which accounts for about half of the half of the entire Color Space and increases the Average Color Error, and also partly due to the less accurate bluish White Point.

– Source: DisplayMate

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