Zoom’s End-to-End Encryption is Not Going to Be Available for Free Users

Submit

There is no denying that Zoom is perhaps having a moment at the time of writing. The global health crises have hit countless companies and countries at the moment and people are now using video calling apps to connect with their loved ones, friends, families, and even their colleagues. It is safe to say that Zoom can be seen leading the vanguard, considering how the service has risen in popularity over the past couple of months.

However, all of this attention has also brought in some issues being discovered. Over the past couple of months, Zoom has seen some heavy criticism on privacy and safety concerns from users all over the world. Although they did introduce a lot of new security-oriented features in the 5.0 update, seems like there are issues for this video calling service.

Latest Messenger Rooms Update Brings Personalization and the Ability to Create and Discover Rooms

Zoom Limits End-to-End Encryption to Business and Enterprise Users to Prevent Misuse

Zoom was planning on adding stronger encryption for paid users exclusively. Today, CEO Eric Yuan has confirmed the report, and Alex Stamos, a security consultant further went on and explained why Zoom is in such a position. In simpler terms, Zoom is looking to prevent any abuse or harm from people who are looking to use the app for purposes other than the good ones.

Yuan further went on and talked about how they are willing to work with law enforcement agencies such as FBI and local police departments. Which did raise some eyebrows. However, Stamos talked about how the statement was not clear enough.

He further went on and talked about how Zoom is currently trying to balance things out and trying to improve their privacy. At the same time, it is also trying to reduce the number of people abusing this service.

Zoom Management Sued For Making $173 Million By Selling “Inflated” Shares

At the time of writing, Zoom's Trust and Safety team posses the ability to enter a meeting and report if there is any abuse going on. However, system-wide end-to-end encryption will prevent the employees from doing the same. Which means that there will be no backdoor through which employees can enter Zoom meetings and see if they are being abused or not.

The current solution is to offer end-to-end encryption only to business and enterprise users. However, there is a distinction in that, as well. Organizations that are using the business plans but are not paying for them like educational institutes will also have access to the same level of encryption. According to Stamos, taking this step is not going to eliminate abuse, however, it will reduce it. At the moment, there is no official release date on when Zoom is releasing the encryption features.

Submit