Big Telecom Is So Happy with the Net Neutrality Repeal That It’s Giving Employees Special Bonuses

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Dec 21, 2017
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With the net neutrality rules gone, the giant telecom corporations are super excited and aren’t even making any efforts to hide that happiness. As a result of the net neutrality repeal and “the passage of tax reform”, Comcast has announced $1,000 bonus for its non-executive employees. In an announcement made yesterday, Comcast chief Brian Roberts added that the company will spend “in excess of $50 billion” to radically improve its broadband, television, film and theme park offerings.

“Based on the passage of tax reform and the FCC’s action on broadband, Brian L. Roberts, Chairman and CEO of Comcast NBCUniversal, announced that the Company would award special $1,000 bonuses to more than one hundred thousand eligible frontline and non-executive employees.”

The announcement followed a similar pledge from AT&T, which is also offering a special $1,000 bonus to more than its 200,000 frontline staff over the holidays. “We will increase our U.S. investment and pay a special bonus to our U.S. employees,” AT&T chief Randall Stephenson said.

net-neutrality-fccRelated BREAKING: Senate Votes to Reverse FCC’s Net Neutrality Repeal

Why net neutrality repeal wasn’t a partisan issue but a solid win for Big Telecom

While the Federal Communications Commission did its best to ignore the American public comment process and repealed the net neutrality rules by turning it into a partisan issue, it has long been established that this is not an anti-Trump or pro-Obama issue. In our brief timeline we saw that the big telecom corporations routinely violated consumer rights and engaged in anti-competitive behavior before the net neutrality rules were finally passed after years of public outcry.

With the rules gone (technically, they are still in place, as it will take a few months for the new Internet Freedom Order to come into effect), telecom companies have a free rein that enables them to throttle speeds, block access to content they don’t like or can’t compete against, and introduce fast lanes.

2017 has probably been the best year for telecom companies in a long time. Not only they can trash their competition by prioritizing their own content, but they are also now allowed (thanks again to efforts of ex-Verizon employee, Ajit Pai) to sell their customers’ data without their consent as Senate, Congress and President had all approved to reverse a landmark FCC privacy rule earlier this year.

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