NVIDIA Canvas, AI App To Turn Doodles Into Photorealistic Renderings, Is Now Free

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NVIDIA is assisting beginner and seasoned artists to create amazing works of art, thanks to the company's new AI tool, aptly named Canvas.

Canvas allows the user to choose different landscape elements, in this case water, rocks and sand, and the user then applies simple lines and shapes to the screen. Canvas, with its powerful AI, takes those shapes and changes them into mountains, ocean, and a sunny beach.

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An example of Canvas processing the shapes on the left and creating realistic scenery.

Canvas offers the user to select from 15 different elements and 9 environmental styles to suit any situation required of the artist's creativity. The finalized creation can then be exported into Adobe Photoshop for further editing. The advanced software also keeps separate layers to help with efficiency and ease of use for the creator.

A sample of one of the layers created by NVIDIA's Canvas tool.
The finalized art, complete with the Wccftech rockface.

Canvas is currently in beta and free to download from NVIDIA's website here. The compatibility requirements needed are 1.1 GB free of hard drive space utilizing either NVIDIA RTX, TITAN RTX, GeForce RTX, or Quadro RTX GPU, with a minimum of 460.89 or later drivers, and running Windows 10.

Use AI to turn simple brushstrokes into realistic landscape images. Create backgrounds quickly, or speed up your concept exploration so you can spend more time visualizing ideas.

Paint simple shapes and lines with a palette of real world materials, like grass or clouds. Then, in real-time, our revolutionary AI model fills the screen with show-stopping results. Don’t like what you see? Swap a material, changing snow to grass, and watch as the entire image changes from a winter wonderland to a tropical paradise. The creative possibilities are endless. - NVIDIA on Canvas App

If nothing else, this app is a lot of fun to mess around in and create some surprisingly photorealistic renderings form basic doodles. It would be interesting to see someone use the static frames generated by this app and come up with one that can do the same for videos. We are fairly certain a script could be created to feed the app input frames which can then be turned into photorealistic animations.

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