New Amazon CEO Commits to Making Videogames: ‘Success Will Come’

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, also founder of the company and one of the richest men in the world, recently announced he will step down from his position as Chief Executive Officer. Andy Jassy, currently CEO of Amazon Web Services, will take his place in the third quarter of 2021.

A fresh Bloomberg report mentions that the new Amazon CEO immediately sent an internal email to staff members earlier this week to recommit the company to the development of videogames. Jassy said that he believes success will come, provided the necessary focus on 'what matters most' is applied.

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Some businesses take off in the first year, and others take many years. Though we haven’t consistently succeeded yet in Amazon Game Studios, I believe we will if we hang in there.

Being successful right away is obviously less stressful, but when it takes longer, it’s often sweeter. I believe this team will get there if we stay focused on what matters most.

Amazon's effort in the videogames industry began in earnest several years ago, with the announcement of the Lumberyard (a CRYENGINE fork licensed by Amazon) engine and the subsequent reveal of the first three Amazon Game Studios titles Breakaway, Crucible, and New World.

To this date, though, none of these attempts have been successful. Breakaway and Crucible were canceled, while New World has been delayed and partially redesigned, though we'll have to wait a few more months to fully assess it once it ships this Spring. As for the Lumberyard engine, only a handful of non-Amazon projects have opted to use it to date, including Star Citizen, the seemingly defunct The DRG Initiative, and the upcoming Deadhaus Sonata.

Still, such a strong committal from the new Amazon CEO bodes well for the company's future efforts in this growing industry, especially as it resonates with Microsoft CEO Natya Sadella's strong push into gaming and as it contrasts with Google's recent decision to wind down investment in Stadia first-party games development.

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