Best Windows News This Week? Microsoft’s Finally Thinking About Letting Users Resume Interrupted Windows Updates

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Feb 17, 2018
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Microsoft is reportedly planning improvements that will help users resume interrupted Windows 10 downloads instead of having to deal with them from scratch. Almost every Windows user has been in that situation where they have waited hours for a download to finish only to see it all gone. Sometimes this happens because you need to reboot, other times it’s the battery that gets the blame, but this is 2018… Things like this just should not happen!

Now, Windows Central reports that the Redmond software maker is finally planning on enabling users to resume their downloads. Reporting earlier this week, the publication said that users should soon be able to resume their download and installation process instead of having to do things all over again.

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Citing Microsoft’s Dona Sarkar, the publication added that “the decision to introduce the upcoming ‘resume download’ feature was heavily influenced by Microsoft’s experiences with its Windows Insiders4Good Fellowship programs”.

The company has been working with local entrepreneurs across Africa over the last two years, gaining fresh insights into the needs of users in “occasionally connected” markets, where internet access is often more limited and more costly than in developed nations.

While this feature will certainly help Windows users in “occasionally connected” markets or even in developed nations where many people still use slower internet speeds, it will also help those on the fast connections too. Interruptions don’t always happen because of connectivity issues and having to restart them from scratch is just painful.

It is commendable that the company is focusing so much on the feedback it receives – from its Insider community, fellowships programs, and several other avenues – and putting it to good use. While many continue to hate Microsoft for its Windows 10 rollout strategy – which was admittedly the worst marketing (read: nagware) strategy seen in recent years – things have certainly taken a user-centric turn in the past year or so.

– It remains unclear exactly when this feature should be expected. 

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