Microsoft Begins Phasing Out 32-Bit Windows 10

May 14
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Starting with the upcoming Windows 10 May 2020 Update, Microsoft will begin the process of phasing out its support for the 32-bit version of the operating system. The May 2020 Update, or version 2004, is already available to the OEMs, developers, and Windows enthusiasts through the Insider program.

The company apparently hasn't provided a 32-bit variant of the OS to OEMs for the upcoming Windows 10 version 2004. However, it will continue to do so for non-OEM consumers to support various upgrade scenarios. The change only affects future PCs from OEMs.

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"Beginning with Windows 10, version 2004, all new Windows 10 systems will be required to use 64-bit builds and Microsoft will no longer release 32-bit builds for OEM distribution," Microsoft has announced (via Neowin). "This does not impact 32-bit customer systems that are manufactured with earlier versions of Windows 10; Microsoft remains committed to providing feature and security updates on these devices, including continued 32-bit media availability in non-OEM channels to support various upgrade installation scenarios."

Windows 10's road to 64-bit

Several years after introducing its Windows as a Service model, Microsoft only updated its storage requirements for the operating system last year. With this year's feature update, the company is signalling to the eventual death of 32-bit version of the operating system.

For those who have 32-bit Windows 10 devices, the company does promise supporting and offering the right operating system for those machines. You will still be able to buy the 32-bit variant at retail and receive updates for existing copies. However, this is the beginning of the end for 32-bit Windows 10.

- Earlier: Microsoft Says It’s Investigating Issues Being Reported in KB4549951, But Can’t Find Anything in Telemetry

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