Graphene Batteries for Smartphones Ready for Mass Production? U.S.-Based Firm Reportedly Marketing Next-Gen Technology

Jan 19, 2020
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One area of smartphones where we haven’t seen considerable development is the battery. For some reason, the cells used in mobile phones has remained largely the same for many years now. Currently, manufacturers use lithium-ion batteries, which has is its limitations, but thankfully, newer solutions are on the horizon. A Los Angeles-based firm has developed graphene batteries for smartphones that are almost ready for commercialization.

The graphene batteries for smartphones made by Real Graphene company will still use lithium and add a graphene sheet to attain several benefits. Graphene is a great conductor of heat and electricity and generates less heat in the process. The company claims that with this new technology, it will take just 20 minutes to charge a 3000mAh cell with a 60-watt charger, as opposed to 90 minutes, which is the average time right now.

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Moreover, most current batteries can only handle between 300 and 500 charge cycles, but graphene batteries will be able to manage around 1500 cycles. So, in a nutshell, we are looking at faster recharge time, less heat, and longevity, all at the same time.

As for when we can expect to see graphene batteries for smartphones, the firm is already in talks with manufacturers and power banks with the technology already available on Amazon. Graphene is an expensive material and even though its cost has dropped over the years, the one made by Real Graphene will still cost 30 percent more than the current lithium batteries and this should also increase the price of handsets.

However, consumers might not mind that because the use of graphene batteries will also enable them to hold on to their devices for longer. The general expectation is that it will still be a year before the company gets sufficient orders to ramp up production.

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Source: Digital Trends

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