‘Father of the iPod’ Tony Fadell Thinks Apple Should Tackle iPhone Addiction, Says It’s Equivalent Of Nutrition Advice

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Apr 16, 2018
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Today Fadell who is also commonly known as the ‘father of the iPod’ has put a notion up front saying that Apple has a responsibility to handle iPhone addiction. According to Fadell, the idea of tackling iPhone addiction is as important as nutrition advice. The iPhone has left a mark on the entire smartphone industry. So let’s dive in to see some more details on the matter and whether Apple is working to minimize the impacts.

iPhone Addiction Needs To be Tackled, Says Former iPod Inventor

The company’s product is the destination where most of the smartphone manufacturers want to be. For instance the iPhone X notch. Google has added support for it in its upcoming Android P which will allow Android smartphone manufacturers to add a notch on the hardware level. In an argument made to Wired, Fadell stated:

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When it comes to digital “nourishment”, we don’t know what a “vegetable”, a “protein” or a “fat” is. What is “overweight” or “underweight”? What does a healthy, moderate digital life look like? I think that manufacturers and app developers need to take on this responsibility, before government regulators decide to step in – as with nutritional labelling […]

I believe that for Apple to maintain and even grow its customer base it can solve this problem at the platform level, by empowering users to understand more about how they use their devices. To do this, it should let people track their digital activity in detail and across all devices.

Tony Fadell hopes to see users setting targets for usage of the device which is healthy. Moreover, the limiting factors involved in achieving these results is also part of his expectations.

Apple could also let users set their device to a “listen-only” or “read-only” mode, without having to crawl through a settings menu, so that you can enjoy reading an e-book without a constant buzz of notifications.

Apple is also reportedly working on the same area according to a report from Bloomberg which was shared back in February.

Apple’s annual software upgrade this fall will offer users plenty of new features: enabling a single set of apps to work across iPhones, iPads and Macs [and] a Digital Health tool to show parents how much time their children have been staring at their screen.

Parents see a lot of concern in the said area and providing them with greater controls in various sections of the operating system. This could also open new possibilities for Apple in making changes in the firmware. There will be more to the story, so be sure to stay tuned in for more details.

This is all for now, folks. What are your thoughts on the matter? Do you think there should be a usage limiting feature on the digital devices? Share your views with us in the comments.

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