Lenovo Thunderbolt 3 Graphics Dock Costs as Much as a GPU but Features a Thunderbolt 3 Port and Discreet Graphics Processor

Author Photo
Jan 9, 2018
30Shares
Submit

The Lenovo Thunderbolt 3 Graphics Dock is another piece of hardware that has graced the tech world at CES 2018. The external graphics enclosure also houses its own dedicated GPU for better performance and features a bunch of other ports that you can use to your advantage.

Lenovo Thunderbolt 3 Graphics Dock Features a GTX 1050 for Mainstream Graphics Performance

The Lenovo Thunderbolt Graphics Dock has been designed to connect to thin and light notebooks. Normally, these thin and light notebooks might not feature a discrete GPU but do come with their own Thunderbolt 3 port, which will allow you to connect the desktop graphics enclosure with them. Lenovo claims that the IdeaPad 720S is recommended, but you can still connect the dock to a different notebook if you wish.

lenovologo-01-578-80Related Lenovo Announces New ThinkPad P1 Mobile Workstation With Xeon or i9 Support

Lenovo also states that it supports WMR or Windows Mixed Reality at 90Hz and will connect to your notebook via a Type-C USB cable. The new dock is powered by a 170W AC adapter and it is able to provide up to 65W of power. In terms of portability, the Lenovo graphics enclosure is much smaller than competing devices and weighs around 1.51lbs. There are a total of three USB ports (two USB 3.0, one USB 2.0) to connect additional peripherals and storage to your machine.

In addition, you can also connect up to three displays to the dock via an HDMI 2.0 port or two DisplayPort 1.3 interfaces. Side by side, it sports a Gigabit Ethernet port and a headphone-out/mic-in audio combo jack. The Lenovo Thunderbolt 3 Graphics Dock is going to be available to purchase sometime in 2018 and will carry a price of $399.

Though you’re given a lot of options when it comes to connectivity and I/O we honestly wish that the GPU present in the enclosure was able to deliver more performance than a GTX 1050.

Source: Tom’s Hardware

Submit