Google Home Speakers and Smart Displays Get Interpreter Mode Support

Feb 14, 2019 13:33 EST
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Interpreter mode for Google Home speakers and Smart Displays were in the pipeline since Google announced the feature at CES 2018. The Google Assistant got the feature earlier this year, and today, it is rolling out to all Google Home speakers and Smart Displays. Interpreter Mode is essentially the Google Smart Display/Home speaker acting as an interpreter between two people who can't speak the same language.

One can trigger the Interpreter Mode by saying “Ok Google, open interpreter mode.”. You'll then have to specify the two languages that will be used. The list of languages supported is listed below. Similarly, you can also use phrases such as “Hey Google, be my Spanish  interpreter” or “Hey Google, help me speak French” to trigger Interpreter Mode

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Czech Hungarian Russian
Danish Indonesian Slovak
Dutch Italian Spanish
English Japanese Swedish
Finnish Korean Thai
French Mandarin Turkish
German Polish Ukrainian
Greek Portuguese Vietnamese
Hindi Romanian

The Google Home and other Smart Displays get a visual transcription of the translation. As the service uses Google Translate, there are bound to be some errors and visual clues will help catch any bad translations to a reasonable degree. Interpreter mode fully works on smart speakers, with “Stop,” “quit,” and “exit” stopping translation, with the standard left to right swipe also working on screens.

Google plans on using the Interpreter feature at the concierge and front desks of hotels. Trials have already begun at the Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Dream Downtown in New York City and Hyatt Regency San Francisco Airport. The idea is to allow multi-lingual guests to speak freely with the hotel staff. Google says it chose the three locations, in particular, owing to the high volume of guests who speak multiple languages such as Mandarin, Spanish, French, Japanese and Korean. It is unlikely that the Interpreter Mode will be able to match the abilities of a native speaker, but it's better than nothing.

News Source: Google

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