DualSense Controller’s Built-In Mics Can Identify the Player and Filter Background Noise

Apr 8, 2020
Submit

Yesterday Sony unveiled the PlayStation 5's new DualSense Controller, and as you would expect, it’s packed with cool new features, including haptic feedback and a built-in mic array so you can chat without the use of a headset. Of course, there have been a lot of questions about the latter – how would the built-in mic option compare to a headset? Wouldn’t it end up picking up all sorts of ambient background noise?

Perhaps not! A patent for the DualSense’s mic array was published the day before the controller’s reveal, and apparently, it’s been designed to identify the player’s voice and isolate and filter out background noise. Here’s an explanation of how it works from the patent (thanks to SegmentNext for the find)…

SSD Impact on Games Will Be Massive as We Often Have to Discard Features Due to Long Loads, Says Dev

When three or more microphones are included in the array of microphones, it is possible to determine the location of a sound source relative to the microphone array [that] can be localized based on the relative timing of its sound as captured by each of the microphones.

Taken in combination with the known location and orientation of the controller (as determined based on sensors and tracking methods) and by extension the known location and orientation of the microphone array, then the location of the sound source within the interactive environment can be determined. Furthermore, captured sound can be processed to exclude sounds which do not emanate from a certain region of the interactive environment.

The DualSense will also be able to eliminate any crosstalk if more than one person is playing locally. Oh, and don't worry, it has been confirmed you can still plug traditional headsets into the controller. Another patent also reveals a bit more about the DualSense’s improved touchpad, which will be able to remember certain gestures. The patent further hints that the PS5 may use the touchpad more heavily, with the system’s UI perhaps having a full “touchscreen” control option.

Needless to say, it seems Sony is trying some ambitious things with the DualSense controller, and I’m sure there a lot more tidbits to learn about it. What do you think? Do you see yourself making use of the DualSense’s new features like the built-in mics?

Submit