Google’s Pixel Smartphone Lineup Is Going to Be IP53 Certified – What Does This Mean?

Omar Sohail
Posted Sep 22, 2016
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The ‘Nexus’ brand name seems to be withering away as Google is now going to be naming its mobile devices as Pixel. However, while we are expecting to see premium Android smartphones in terms of build quality and hardware, protection against the elements that seek to wreak havoc on your device might not be so effective, and here’s why.

IP53 Certification Means That Google Pixel Devices Will Not Hold up Well Against Large Bodies of Water

Not surprisingly, HTC 10 also came with the IP53 certification. It all boils down to the numbers’ game, and the number ‘5’ in the certification means that the device is dust proof but only at the most basic of levels. The second digit, which is ‘3’ tells about how the smartphone would fare when coming in contact with water and the results are not so encouraging for users who erroneously get their devices wet. I said ‘not surprisingly’ because Google has teamed up with HTC to release the Pixel smartphone family, although it would have been a better idea to give them a more effective certification. IP67 at the bare minimum would have been great, but I guess we’ll have to settle for this.

The bread and better of the Nexus phones, or in this case, Pixel phones will be running stock Android, and getting the first software and security updates is always a necessary perk to have. This time, however, Google and HTC are intending to release premium devices to the smartphone populace, as the price tag could hover around the $649 range. While we could say that Google is getting serious about this, the last time a $649 Nexus handset was released, it didn’t do well at all and was absurdly large at the same time (yes, you’ve guessed it, it was the Nexus 6).

Hopefully, this time, there will be a number of noteworthy upgrades from the Pixel lineup that will justify the aforementioned price tag? Are you guys of the same opinion? Tell us your thoughts in the comments right away.

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