After Reducing Chromebook-Killer Windows 10 S to a “Mode,” Microsoft Appears to Be Completely Ditching the Idea

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Jul 12, 2018
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Microsoft introduced the “Windows 10 S mode” last month with the Windows 10 RS5 build 17686. The “S mode” is designed to enable businesses to restrict a machine to a more secure and controlled environment where external apps couldn’t be installed and users are limited to UWP apps only. This “mode” is actually the company demoting Windows 10 S, an entire operating system in itself that Microsoft was ambitious could beat Chrome OS. As we reported last month:

When Microsoft released Windows 10 S, users were given an option to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro. However, the company later announced turning this separate edition of Windows 10 to a “mode” that offers businesses and educational institutes offer a browser-based version of the full-grown operating system.

Microsoft had said that the new “Windows 10 S mode” will replace the existing Windows 10 S SKU and will be offered as the locked-down version of Windows 10 Home, Pro and Enterprise.

However, even this “mode” has now disappeared (via Neowin) from the Windows 10 Settings app with the release of this week’s Windows 10 Redstone 5 Insider Preview build 17713.

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It isn’t immediately clear what this removal exactly hints at since Microsoft has remained confused about this entire Chrome OS competitor thing since the day one. But right now it looks like that at least what users thought would enable them to “toggle” between full-fledged Windows 10 Home, Enterprise and Pro editions and the restricted Windows 10 S mode isn’t coming with the upcoming Windows 10 Redstone 5.

Microsoft also announced last night that the company is almost done with the development of Redstone 5 and will soon move on to the development of Windows 10 versions releasing in 2019. The upcoming Windows 10 version (expected to be 1809) is slated for a release later this year.

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