Intel Core i7-8086K Anniversary Limited Edition, 5 GHz, 6 Core, 12 Thread Processor Review

By Hassan Mujtaba  / 

40 years ago, Intel released their iconic and one of the most successful line of x86 processors known as the 8086. The processor was the first one of the first CPUs to feature a 16-bit design along with a 5 MHz clock speed, based on a 3 µm process node. Fast forward to 2018, Intel is celebrating the anniversary of their commercially successful 8086 processor by releasing the anniversary edition, Core i7-8086K processor.

Part of the Intel Coffee Lake-S family which launched last year, the 8th generation Core i7-8086K is based on the 14nm++ process node. It features 6 cores and is the fastest commercially available 6 core processor in the market. Advancements in technology and architecture have allowed Intel to reach clock speeds of 5 GHz on their latest processor.

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The Coffee Lake-S 8th Generation family, was the first big core count jump on the mainstream 300 series platform. The Core i7-8086K not only offers the higher core count, but it also comes with the fastest clock speeds. The chip was announced back at Computex 2018 in June and was available in the market later that month.

Today, I will be taking a look at this special anniversary edition variant provided by Intel and see how it holds up to modern day tasks and whether it can keep up to the legacy of its 40-year-old predecessor, the original, the Intel 8086. Intel's robust Z370 platform offers superb compatibility with all of the latest 8th generation processors and I will be testing the processor on one of the high-end motherboards to see how the chip holds up.

Intel Z370 Express Chipset - The Top 300-Series PCH

Since the launch of Coffee Lake processors, Intel is also offering a new platform that is marked under the 300-series family.

The Intel 300 series platform features several chipset SKUs but the top of the line is the Z370 PCH. The Z370 platform is exclusively built to support Coffee Lake CPUs meaning that while we can expect later CPU launches (9th Gen) to feature support on the current platform, all CPUs that came before will not work on the new motherboards. We have more details on this in the LGA 1151 socket section so here, we will be taking a look at the Z370 feature set and what it offers over the previous 200 and 100 series platforms.

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Intel Z370 PCH Features:

The 8th gen desktop platform has a range of new features that mainly include:

And of course, powering the new platform is the Z370 PCH. The PCH offers the following:

Expected Intel 300-Series Kaby Lake Refresh and Cannon Lake PCH Features:

Chipset NameCoffee Lake S (KBL-R) PCH / Z370 PlatformCoffee Lake S (CNL-H) PCH / 300 Series (Z390/H370, B360, Q370, H310)
Process Node22nm14nm
Processor8C, 6C, 4C (6 Consumer SKUs at Launch)
Enhanced IA and Memory Overclocking
Gen 9 Intel Graphics GT2 (Up To 24 EUs)
Consumer Only
8C, 6C, 4C, 2C (Full corporate/consumer SKU stack at launch)
Enhanced IA and Memory Overclocking
Gen 9 Intel Graphics GT2 (Up To 24 EUs)
Corporate/vPro & Consumer
MemoryUp To DDR4-2666 (Native)Up To DDR4-2666 (Native)
Media, Display & AudioDP 1.2 & HDMI 1.4
HDCP 2.2 (HDMI 2.0a w/LSPCON)
HEVC & VP9 10-bit Enc/Dec, HDR, Rec.2020, DX12
Integrated Dual-Core Audio DSP
DP 1.2 & HDMI 1.4
HDCP 2.2 (HDMI 2.0a w/LSPCON)
HEVC & VP9 10-bit Enc/Dec, HDR, Rec.2020, DX12
Integrated Dual-Core Audio DSP
SoundWire Digital Audio Interface
I/O & ConnectivityIntegrated USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps)
Thunderbolt 3.0 (Alpine Ridge)
Integrated USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps)
Integrated Intel Wireless-AC (Wi-Fi / BT CNVi)
Integrated SDXC 3.0 Controller
Thunderbolt 3.0 (Titan Ridge) w/ DP 1.4
StorageNext Gen Intel Optane memory
PCIe 3.0, SATA 3.0
Next Gen Intel Optane memory
PCIe 3.0, SATA 3.0
SecurityIntel SGX 1.0Intel SGX 1.0
Power ManagementC8 SupportC10 & S0ix Support for Modern Standby
Launch20172018

Intel LGA 1151 Socket Again - Now With 8th Generation Processor Support

Intel isn't moving away from the LGA 1151 socket anytime soon. We are once again looking at the same socket which has been doing the rounds in the mainstream market since 2015. There is, however, a major difference. There's no backward compatibility with Skylake and Kaby Lake processors.

That brings us to the next significant detail about the Intel 300-series platform. Intel is confirming that the Coffee Lake processors are only compatible with the 300-series chipset. The reason cited by Intel is the change in electrical lanes and power delivery that Z370 improves substantially. We did have a word with some motherboard manufacturers and while they reveal that Coffee Lake may work with older motherboards, it won’t deliver the same level of stability or clocks as on the Z370 series motherboards.

A more detailed analysis was posted by David Schor a few days ago which confirms the change in pin configuration on Coffee Lake processors, hence keeping the LGA 1151 socket on Z370 boards exclusive to Coffee Lake chips.

According to David, the reason we don't have Coffee Lake processors compatible with older series motherboards that feature the LGA 1151 socket is the change in pins. For instance, if the pin config changes on a processor, the sockets on the motherboard need to be configured as such. It's not a process that can be done via software as its more of a hardware level change.

When compared, the Coffee Lake processors have 391 VSS (Ground) pins which is an increase of 14 compared to Kaby Lake, 146 VCC (Electrical) pins which is an increase of 18 pins compared to Kaby Lake and about 25 pins that are reserved and a decrease of 21 pins from the 46 reserved on Kaby Lake.

Kaby Lake -> Coffee Lake

Intel LGA 1151 CPU Pin Configuration (Coffee Lake vs Kaby Lake):

So one thing is clear, Intel was in fact telling the truth about electrical changes to the processors and socket in the 300-series platform. Furthermore, it's not just the reserved pins from Kaby Lake that have simply been populated. There are pins aside the reserved ones that were swapped with VCC pins and indicate a design tweak.

While we can put many theories to rest with this new detail, I think much of the confusion could have just been avoided if Intel clarified this themselves. Of course, if you are making the boards with a new PCH and new series of processors on the same socket that ran the previous CPU line, consumers would definitely want to know more about why the new platform that has the same socket cannot support their older chips. We previously heard about the LGA 1151 V2 naming scheme and that may have sorted some confusion but as we can tell, all motherboards still use the LGA 1151 naming scheme which may lead to people thinking that their 6th and 7th generation processors can run on the newer boards.

Cooler Compatibility With LGA 1151 Socket

Keeping the same socket has some advantages in the form of cooler compatibility. All users who are running the LGA 1151 socket or even LGA 1150 boards can use the same cooler on the Z370 boards without any hassle. The socket has the same dimensions and no changes are made aside from electrical changes that are specific to socket and processor pins. The socket assembly and mounting remain the same.

Intel does offer a separate boxed cooler but it will be a much better choice to get an AIB cooling solution since those offer better cooling performance. It is recommended for the unlocked SKUs that users run them on a high-end air cooler or liquid cooling solution. Custom loop cooling will deliver even better results.

First of all, what is Coffee Lake? In simple terms, Coffee Lake is an improved Kaby Lake that has been made possible with the latest 14nm++ process node. Intel briefed in their webinar before the launch that Coffee Lake is on the same architectural level as Kaby Lake with no changes at all.

Aside from that, the new 14nm process allows for improved power efficiency and higher clock speeds. There's a reason that Intel is bumping up the core count across their entire range of processors. The Intel Core i7 and Core i5 lineup get 6 cores (HT/Non-HT) while the Core i3 lineup gets 4 cores.

The Intel Core i7 and Core i5 processors with 6 cores feature the same TDPs as their predecessors so bumping up the core count hasn't changed the TDP numbers. Actual power consumption may vary during testing real-world applications but for that, you'd have to wait for our review in the coming weeks. You will also note that Intel has given a fairly good bump to both CPU and integrated GPU clock speeds which is only possible with the new and improved 14nm++ process.

Intel Coffee Lake CPUs Have 16 PCIe 3.0 Lanes, PCH Supports 24 PCIe 3.0 Lanes - These Make Up The 40 PCIe Platform Lanes

Now one thing you might have noticed in other articles is that they state the Intel Coffee Lake platform will feature 40 PCIe Lanes. That's true but not entirely an accurate representation. As you see, Intel does have 40 PCIe 3.0 lanes on their upcoming family but those are a combination of CPU and PCH lanes. All Coffee Lake CPUs feature 16 PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes while the Z370 PCH features 24 PCIe 3.0 lanes. These make up the 40 PCIe 3.0 lanes that Intel claims of.

This means that people can add in two GPUs for SLI or mGPU support which will be given to the CPU while PCH can allow for additional devices such as PCIe / M.2 storage or Intel Optane support.

The Intel 8th Gen, Unlocked Core Desktop Family Full Specifications and Prices

Intel includes three "K" unlocked CPUs in the lineup while the rest are locked CPUs that don't feature overclocking but great for budget users in their own place. As of right now, the 8th Gen unlocked family consists of the Core i7-8086K, Core i7-8700K, Core i5-8600K and the Core i3-8350K.

Following are the detailed specs for these CPUs:

Intel Core i7-8700K – The Coffee Lake Flagship With 6 Cores and Boost of Up To 5 GHz

The Intel Core i7-8086K processor will be an anniversary model to mark 40 years since the release of Intel’s iconic 8086 microprocessor. This will be the second-anniversary edition mode that Intel has released with the first being the Pentium G3258 which marked the 20th anniversary of Intel’s first Pentium chip.

The Core i7-8086K will be the fastest 6 core processor that Intel has to offer while being similar in core configuration as the Core i7-8700K. It will feature 6 cores, 12 threads and 12 MB of L3 cache. The TDP is maintained at 95 Watts which is the same as the Core i7-8700K. The clock speeds are currently the fastest for an Intel 6 core processor.

A photo of the Intel 8086k processor packaging( Credit: Intel Corporation)

We are looking at a base clock of 4.00 GHz which boosts all the way up to 5.0 GHz. The 5.0 GHz boost clock is single-core and all core boost is rated at 4.4 GHz but mostly stable at 4.3 GHz unless provided proper cooling. The processor is a ‘K’ SKU and can be further overclocked but we don’t expect large gains in overclocking considering the 95W TDP can be a barrier for most users. Still, anything above the 5 GHz mark would be a nice extra gain in performance for enthusiasts. The CPU costs $429 US and is available in very limited quantities due to it being a limited edition variant.

Intel Core i7-8700K – The Performance To Dollar King With 6 Cores and 4.3 GHz Boost Across All Cores

The Intel Core i7-8700K was the flagship processor of the lineup in 2017, however, it was replaced by the 8086K which is the top variant now. It features 6 cores and 12 threads. The chip is fully compatible with the LGA 1151 socket on Z370 motherboards. The chip was Intel’s first hexa core product based on the 14nm++ process node.

In terms of clock speeds, we are looking at a 3.7 GHz base frequency which boosts up to 4.3 GHz (6 core) and 4.7 GHz (1 core). These clocks are really impressive so we can expect much faster gaming performance on Coffee Lake parts than the current generation of CPUs. The chip is fully unlocked allowing for overclocking and comes with a TDP of 95W. There’s 12 MB of L3 cache on board along with a GT2 tier integrated GPU. The chip supports DDR4-2666 MHz memory (native) and up to 4400 MHz+ (OC). The Intel Core i7-8700K costs $359 US so that is about $70 US less than the 8086K.

Intel Core i5-8600K – The Gamer Aimed Hexa Core With Overclocking Capability and 4.3 GHz Boost

The Intel Core i5-8600K is the second unlocked chip in the lineup and features a hexacore design. The Intel Core i5 series will stick with 6 cores but they will not feature a multi-threaded design. The chip features 9 MB of L3 cache while being supported on the LGA 1151 socket and Z370 PCH based boards.

In terms of clock speeds, we are looking at 3.5 GHz base, 4.2 GHz (6 core), 4.3 GHz (1 core) boost clocks. The chip will feature a TDP of 95W and the pricing will be set at $257 US which is just a few bucks over $242 US Price of the Core i5-7600K making it a great option for gamers who want some extra cores inside their rigs.

Intel Core i3-8350K – A Quad Core i3 Processor With 4 GHz Clock Speed

The Intel Core i3-8350K is the only unlocked Core i3 chip in the 8th Gen family that enables overclocking support. Intel’s 8th Gen Core i3 family is also the first to feature 4 cores which will be a great deal for budget builders. The Intel Core i3-8350K comes with 4 cores and 4 threads that are clocked at 4.0 GHz. The chip features 6 MB of cache and will feature a TDP of 91W.

Intel Coffee Lake 8th Gen Desktop Core Lineup:

CPU NameIntel Core i3-8100Intel Core i3-8350KIntel Core i5-8400Intel Core i5-8600KIntel Core i7-8700Intel Core i7-8700KIntel Core i7-8086K
CPU FamilyCoffee Lake-SCoffee Lake-SCoffee Lake-SCoffee Lake-SCoffee Lake-SCoffee Lake-SCoffee Lake-S
CPU Process14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm
CPU Cores4466666
CPU Threads4466121212
Base Clock3.60 GHz4.00 GHz2.80 GHz3.60 GHz 3.20 GHz3.70 GHz4.00 GHz
Boost Clock (Max)N/AN/A4.00 GHz4.30 GHz4.60 GHz4.70 GHz5.00 GHz
Boost Clock (6 Core)N/AN/A3.50 GHz4.40 GHz4.20 GHz4.30 GHz4.30 GHz
L2 Cache1 MB (256 KB per Core)1 MB (256 KB per Core)1.5 MB (256 KB per Core)1.5 MB (256 KB per Core)1.5 MB (256 KB per Core)1.5 MB (256 KB per Core)1.5 MB (256 KB per Core)
L3 Cache6 MB6 MB9 MB9 MB12 MB12 MB12 MB
Overclocking SupportNoYesNoYesNoYesYes
Socket SupportLGA 1151LGA 1151LGA 1151LGA 1151LGA 1151LGA 1151LGA 1151
PCH300-Series300-Series300-Series300-Series300-Series300-Series300-Series
TDP65W91W65W95W65W95W95W
Price$117 US$168 US$182 US$257 US$303 US$359 US$429 US

Intel Details Overclocking and Gaming Performance Figures - Our Advice, Wait For Reviews

Intel also detailed some performance numbers for their Coffee Lake processors. First of all, we have overclocking details. Intel claims that Coffee Lake processors are the best chips designed for overclocking. There is a range of new features supported by the chips which include:

The combination of these tools and features will presumably deliver better overclocking and even faster performance out of the chips. In terms of pure gaming performance, Intel says that the Core i7-8700K, when paired with a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti class graphics card delivers up to 195 FPS in the Gears of War 4 title, that's a 25% increase in FPS over the Core i7-7700K.

The extra number of cores also deliver better streaming performance that is a must in today's gaming ecosystem. We can see up to 45% better performance in Player Unknown Battlegrounds while gaming, streaming and also recording at the same time versus a Core i7-7700K. Compared to a 3-year-old PC with something like Haswell or Ivy Bridge inside it, we can see a difference of 2X which sounds great.

Intel Coffee Lake PCB Thickness Compared To Kaby Lake and Core X Processors

For testing, we used the latest Intel Core i7-8086K, Core i7-8700K and Core i5-8600K CPUs which were sent to us by Intel. The Intel Coffee Lake family comes with a higher core count on the mainstream platform but prices are close to the predecessors in the same segment. The CPUs were tested on the AORUS Z370 Gaming 7 motherboard.

Intel Core i7-8086K Test Bench:

ProcessorIntel Core i7-8086K
MotherboardAORUS Z370 Gaming 7
Power SupplyCorsair RM 750X Gold Plus
Solid State DriveSamsung SSD 960 EVO M.2 (512 GB)
MemoryG.SKILL Trident Z RGB Series 32 GB (4 x 8GB) CL16 3600 MHz
Video CardsMSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Lightning X
Cooling SolutionsCorsair H115i GTX
OSWindows 10 64-bit

Our test rig includes the Samsung 960 EVO 500 GB SSD that boots up our main OS while a 2 TB Seagate HDD is used for demonstration purposes for the Intel Optane memory. In addition to these, we are running an MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Lightning X graphics card, a Corsair RM 750X Gold Plus power supply and 32 GB of G.Skill provided Trident Z RGB series memory which runs with a clock speed of DDR4-3600 MHz. For cooling, we used the Cryorig R1 Ultimate and Corsair H115i PRO coolers to see how the new Coffee Lake CPUs perform on both air and liquid cooling solutions.

We won't be focusing on Intel's Core i7-8086K architecture in this review since it is entirely the same chip as Skylake along with minor improvements. The Skylake / Kaby Lake architecture analysis can be seen in detail here. For overclocking, I made the following tweaks to the CPUs:

3DMark Time Spy CPU Performance

3DMark Firestrike is the widely popular video card benchmark test for Windows that is designed to measure your PC’s gaming performance. While the overall benchmark is great, the utility also provides a good indication of the CPU performance.

3DMark Firestrike CPU Performance

3DMark Firestrike is the widely popular video card benchmark test for Windows that is designed to measure your PC’s gaming performance. While the overall benchmark is great, the utility also provides a good indication of the CPU performance.

Blender

Blender is the free and open source 3D creation suite. It supports the entirety of the 3D pipeline—modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, even video editing and game creation.

Cinebench R15

CINEBENCH is a real-world cross platform test suite that evaluates your computer’s performance capabilities. CINEBENCH is based on MAXON’s award-winning animation software CINEMA 4D, which is used extensively by studios and production houses worldwide for 3D content creation. MAXON software has been used in blockbuster movies such as Iron Man 3, Oblivion, Life of Pi or Prometheus and many more.

HandBrake

HandBrake is a tool for converting video from nearly any format to a selection of modern, widely supported codecs.

PCMark 10

PCMark 10 is a complete PC benchmarking solution for Windows 10. It includes several tests that combine individual workloads covering storage, computation, image and video manipulation, web browsing and gaming. Specifically designed for the full range of PC hardware from netbooks and tablets to notebooks and desktops, PCMark 10 offers complete Windows PC performance testing for home and business use.

POV-Ray

The POV-Ray package includes detailed instructions on using the ray-tracer and creating scenes. Many stunning scenes are included with POV-Ray so you can start creating images immediately when you get the package.

SuperPI

Super PI is used by many overclockers to test the performance and stability of their computers. In the overclocking community, the standard program provides a benchmark for enthusiasts to compare “world record” pi calculation times and demonstrate their overclocking abilities. The program can also be used to test the stability of a certain overclock speed.

WinRAR

WinRAR is a powerful archive manager. It can backup your data and reduce the size of email attachments, decompresses RAR, ZIP and other files downloaded from the Internet and create new archives in RAR and ZIP file format.

X264 HD Encode Benchmark

This benchmark measures the encoding performance of the processor. It offers a standardized benchmark for the clip as well as the encoder used is uniform.

Ashes of The Singularity

Stardock's Ashes of the Singularity RTS title is a new take on the historical genre. The game incorporates several things that many pc gamers have been curious about and anxious to try for themselves such as Explicit Multi-Adapter Support and full Asynchronous Compute under DirectX 12 API. We tested the game at 1440P with 4x MSAA on Crazy Settings under DirectX 12.

Battlefield 1

Battlefield 1 is the kind of game that doesn’t need any real introduction. The latest installment of the Battlefield series is as beautiful as anyone would expect and comes right out of the gate with full DX11 and DX12. EA and DICE did a fantastic job with their AAA WW1 shooter this time by implementing some key gaming technologies. We tested the game at 1440P using Ultra settings and DirectX 11 API.

DOOM

In 2016, Id finally released Doom. My testing wouldn’t be complete without including this title. It's a hell fest featuring fast-paced FPS action and tons of demons to kill. The latest title is based on both Vulkan and OpenGL APIs that take advantage of the latest multi-core and multi-GPU upgrades.

GTA V

GTA V is one handsomely optimized title for the PC audience. It's scalable across various PC configurations and delivers an impressive frame rate. Rockstar did an amazing job with the PC build of GTA V and it comes with a large array of settings that can be configured by PC gamers. We tested the title at 1440P with everything set to Ultra and 4x MSAA.

Mass Effect Andromeda

Being a huge fan of the Mass Effect series, I was highly anticipating the arrival of Andromeda to store shelves. Now that it’s here, I put the fastest gaming card to the test. Using Frostbite, the latest Mass Effect title looks incredibly gorgeous and the open world settings on the different planets immerses you a lot.

The rise of the Tomb Raider

The latest Rise of the Tomb Raider title gets lots of graphical enhancements added by Crystal Dynamics and Nixxes, including hardware tessellation, increased anisotropic filtering, additional dynamic foliage, increased LOD, additional PureHair strands, sun soft shadows, and improved bokeh DOF. We tested the game at 1440P under DirectX 12 API.

Sid Meir's Civilization VI

Civilization VI is the pinnacle of the series. It's featured huge, sweeping changes, and nothing was left out. Everything has found a purpose, they all work together in tandem but also have a reason to stand alone. It uses a more fleshed out engine that now supports DirectX 12 capabilities. We tested the game with every setting maxed out (4x MSAA, 4096x4096 shadow textures) at 1440P in DirectX 12.

Watch Dogs 2

Watch Dogs 2 once again takes us on a hacking tour, but this time in the city of San Francisco. Using a very evolved version of the OPUS engine the developers should have a better grasp on things this go around than they did with Watch Dogs. The new engine incorporates several NVIDIA Gameworks technologies and is seen as one of the most graphics intensive titles to launch this year. We tested the game on a mix of Ultra and high settings at 1440P (Temporal Filtering Disabled).

The Coffee Lake architecture is meant to improve overall system power consumption and add to the efficiency. In the case of the 8th Gen CPUs, we are looking at refined 14nm++ process which allows Intel to gain improved clock speeds and increase the number of cores within the same power envelope.

With the frequency bump, the new chips do end up with higher power consumption both in idle and load states. The Intel Core i7-8086K when overclocked, breaches the 400W barrier. The Core i7-8700K also remains over 400W with an overclock of 5.2 GHz while the Core i5-8600K was steady at 386W when overclocked to 5.1 GHz.

The Intel Coffee Lake processors feature higher clock speeds and more cores, this means that the temperatures can directly be affected by the updated design. In terms of packaging, the processor's ship with the same TIM between the IHS that has been used on previous mainstream Intel CPUs. In short, they aren't as great as soldered ones but we should expect temps to stay under somewhat level of control due to tweaking. The results were carried out with the Corsair H115i PRO liquid cooler:

The Intel Core i7-8086K is a product that celebrates the anniversary of chipzilla's 40-year journey since the 8086, the first x86 microprocessor to hit commercial availability. Being so, it is currently the fastest mainstream chip which you can buy (at least until quantities last since this is a limited edition model).

The processor I tested is a special model which reminds us of how far processors have developed since the inception of the x86 architecture. In terms of the product itself, the Core i7-8086K has a lot of similarities with the Core i7-8700K. You will find little to no differences in terms of processor performance when running applications or games. Yes, the Core i7-8086K offers slightly higher 5 GHz boost speeds when a single core is being operated upon but that's a rarity in multi-threaded apps. Some games definitely do see a good boost in performance but they are a small minority to talk about.

A photo of the original Intel 8086 processor from 1978 next to the new Intel Core i7-8086K limited edition processor. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Nevertheless, the 5 GHz boost speed is a first for Intel and the 4 GHz base clock is really good too. The thing to note is that while out of the box performance is definitely better than the 8700K, the 8700 K is just about as fast as the 8086K when it comes to overclocking. This is due to the limited clock expansion that you can get out of the 95W design. Also, in terms of pricing, you will be paying 20% more over the Core i7-8700K to get at most 2-3% better performance.

I don't think that's worth a deal but especially when the 8700K is such a capable processor in its own right. Then again, this variant is a limited model and won't be available for a long duration like the 8700K and to those who get to buy one, it may be an item worth owning as a showpiece after its retirement.

The Intel Core i7-8086K features great performance out of the box and celebrates one of the most iconic moment in the x86 architecture history but the Core i7-8700K does almost everything that the 8086K could do for $70 US less.

Contents

9.0

The Intel Core i7-8086K features great performance out of the box and celebrates one of the most iconic moment in the x86 architecture history but the Core i7-8700K does almost everything that the 8086K could do for $70 US less.

Performance10
Value7.0
Design & Aesthetics9.0
Features10

Pros

  • Great out of the box performance (4 GHz base / 5 GHz boost clocks)
  • Fastest Intel 6 core processor as of right now
  • Faster multitasking performance
  • Excellent Gaming performance
  • Features enhanced 14nm++ process node and 6/12 core config
  • Over 4 GHz boost across all cores at stock configuration
  • Great overclocking capabilities

Cons

  • Very high price ($429 US)
  • Very high power consumption when overclocked
  • Very high temperatures when overclocked
  • Performance not that great when compared to the Core i7-8700K (both stock and overclocked)
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