Huawei’s HongMeng (Kirin OS?) Is 9 Years Old & Optimized For Linux

May 20
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After Google rescinded Huawei’s Android license and reports of other companies ceasing their dealings with the company emerged, we’ve now got a photograph of a power point presentation. This image is from a university in Shanghai, and its source claims that it marks the beginning of Huawei’s custom operating system dubbed ‘HongMeng’.

Google’s announcement is a major setback to Huawei, who sells gadgets all around the world. Cutting off Play Store access, and forcing Huawei on Android Open Source will leave the company’s devices vulnerable to security exploits. While Huawei’s fate isn’t fully sealed, a report from China suggests that the company might recover. Take a look below for more details.

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Huawei’s Custom Operating System Commenced Development In 2012 At Shanghai’s Jiaotong University

While Google’s sanctions might be today’s news, Huawei has invested its time and effort into developing a custom mobile operating system for seven years. This software, alleged dub bed as HongMeng started out in Shanghai’s Jiatong University in 2012, and since then, not only has it witnessed small-scale deployment but also won government awards. Whether this is the same operating system as Kirin OS is unknown for now.

Today’s photograph suggests that, just like Kirin OSHongMeng is optimized for Linux, and the OS has already been deployed in Huawei’s gadgets. It was also declared as 2018’s best innovation by the Chinese Ministry of Education.

Apart from these details, the image does not dive into evaluating Huawei’s capability to deploy the OS on future devices. In all likelihood, the company might negotiate a settlement with the authorities – a fact that will benefit Google heavily. Forgoing Huawei means forgoing royalties and sales commissions for apps sold through the Play Store in the future. Should Google and Huawei fail to mend their ties, Huawei will find it hard to maintain its current trajectory of catching up with Samsung in the smartphone market.

Additionally, Huawei’s problems are not limited to software only, as other reports have suggested that a consortium of American hardware manufacturers will not supply their products to the company until it reaches a deal with the government.

Thoughts? Let us know what you think in the comments section below and stay tuned. We’ll keep you updated on the latest.

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