AMD Ryzen 7 Review Roundup – Official Launch Coverage, Reviewer Remarks and Details of All Ryzen 7 Processors

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Mar 2, 2017
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The wait is finally over, AMD Ryzen CPUs have officially launched and are now available for gamers and enthusiasts to purchase. Reviews of AMD’s next generation processors also go live today,  so here’s our roundup of AMD’s Ryzen 7 processor reviews.

AMD Ryzen 7 Review Roundup – The Next Generation CPU Family From Team Red

Enthusiasts and gamers, rejoice! After five long years, AMD has finally launched their next-generation of Ryzen processors. The new processors are based on the industry leading 14nm process which ensures a true balance of performance and efficiency. The AMD Ryzen processors bring with them an outstanding 52% IPC increase which is higher than AMD’s goal of 40%, that was promised a few years back. All in all, the Ryzen processors are a revolution in terms of performance and pricing in the CPU market and more on that can be seen in the reviews below:

vega_frontier_launch_press_deck_final-02Related AMD Radeon Vega II Trademark Unveiled Along With 7nm Radeon Vega GPU Brand Logo

AMD Ryzen 7 Review Roundup:

Reviewer’s Remarks on AMD Ryzen Processors:

Ryan Shrout  – PCPerspective:

We still have questions and not everything is perfect. The single threaded performance between the Ryzen 7 1800X and the Core i7-7700K leans in Intel’s favor across the board, with that advantage moving from mid-single digits to 25%+ depending on the application. Gaming results are particularly concerning as AMD has been pushing Ryzen as a gamers and enthusiasts dream solution, combining “good enough” gaming ability with amazing multi-threaded capability.

It’s hard to argue with what we see today though and I’ll be awarding the Ryzen 7 1800X with our Gold Award, offering the performance of a Core i7-6900K for half the price!

Mark Walton – Arstechnica:

AMD Ryzen 7 1800X review: Good, but not for gamers

Gaming isn’t a strong point for AMD’s fledgling architecture. For many, myself included, that is a massive disappointment. AMD clearly sees an eight-core future, just as it did with Bulldozer. But developers still aren’t there yet. For all the fuss made about DX12 and the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One ushering in a new era of multicore-optimised games, a 4C/8T CPU continues to be the best way to shovel data over to a graphics card.

The Ryzen 7 1800X, then, is a tale of two chips. One is a disruptive, market changing, eight-core workstation powerhouse; the other is a competent, if wholly unsatisfying gaming CPU.

Intel has certainly been given a kick—I’m just not sure it was hard enough.

Gordon Mah Ung – PCWorld:

amd-ryzen-2nd-gen_8Related AMD Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 5 3600X, First Zen 2 Based 7nm Desktop Processors Teased

AMD’s Ryzen is arguably the most disruptive CPU we’ve seen in a long time for those who need more cores. The CPU basically sells itself when you consider that for the same price as an Intel 8-core Core i7-6900K, you can have an 8-core Ryzen 7 1800X and a GeForce GTX 1080. Hell, you can go a step further and give up a little performance with the Ryzen 7 1700 but step up to a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti—for the same price as that Intel chip. Damn.

But that’s the world Intel has wrought by keeping 8-core CPUs at what many would say are artificially high prices for so long.

Ryzen, however, isn’t a knockout. The gaming disparities at 1080p are sure to spook some buyers. In fact, if you read our Ryzen 7 1700 build against a 5-year-old Core i5 Intel box, you’ll likely be filled with fear, uncertainty, and doubt. Is this really just a game optimization problem as AMD says, or is it some deeper flaw that can’t be corrected?

Still, let’s give AMD credit for what it has pulled off today in essentially democratizing CPU core counts.

SKYMTL – HardwareCanucks:

In-game performance is just about the only performance-driven metric that doesn’t fall into AMD’s happy Ryzen narrative. In titles that weren’t capped by the game engine or bottlenecked by the TITAN X, Ryzen’s winning streak came to an end. The 1800X still provided highly competitive results but in many situations it fell behind the less expensive 7700K and 7600K. This issue isn’t unique to Ryzen since even the once-mighty Broadwell-E processors had problems keeping up as well. As I said when Broadwell-E was launched, mammoth 8-core, 16-thread CPUs are great for people who need that excess horsepower but they go largely underutilized in gaming rigs.

For an immature platform still in its infancy, Summit Ridge and by extension Ryzen is a remarkably well rounded solution and like any fine wine, it will only get better with age. While the 16-thread parts are just now blazing a trail that will ultimately shake the CPU industry’s pricing foundations, they won’t be right for everyone. However, after seeing what the 1800X can accomplish excitement for those six and four core derivatives. But what is clear right now is that Ryzen is indeed the real deal and Intel has been put on notice that AMD is back in the game.

Paul Alcorn – Tomshardware

It’s hard to recommend the Ryzen 7 1800X over Intel’s lower-cost quad-core chips for gaming, especially given the Core i7-7700K’s impressive performance. That’s not a knock against AMD, specifically. After all, we say the same thing about Intel’s own Broadwell-E CPUs. High-end Kaby Lake processors constantly challenge pricier competitors, and the flagship -7700K sells for $350. Even after down-clocking the -7700K to 3.8 GHz, it still beats Ryzen 7 1800X in nearly every game in our suite. Those issues would only be exacerbated on a Ryzen 7 1700X, which operates at lower clock rates.

Conversely, the Ryzen 7 1800X is in its element when you throw professional and scientific workloads at it. It isn’t the fastest in every high-end benchmark, but any calculation that factors in value almost assuredly goes AMD’s way.

It’s a bummer the Ryzen launch was so clearly rushed. We expected AMD to have a better explanation for its gaming performance, but all of the feedback we received from the company came very last-minute. It’s hard to imagine these shortcomings weren’t discovered previously and diagnosed more thoroughly. We’re happy to put in the time and effort, though. Expect more information as it becomes available.

In the meantime, we would recommend Ryzen 7 1800X for heavily-threaded workloads like rendering and content creation. And while we won’t judge a processor on its gaming performance alone, current indications suggest AMD’s $500 flagship doesn’t beat Core i7-7700K for value in that specific segment.

Jarred Walton – PCGamer

The AMD Ryzen 7: plenty of power, but underwhelming gaming performance

With the huge strides in performance relative to the archaic (in CPU terms) FX-8370 Vishera chip, I expected Ryzen to achieve parity with Intel’s X99 processors. It gets there in the CPU-centric tests, but falls well short on gaming performance. And I don’t really have a good explanation, other than the feeling I keep getting that Ryzen was pushed out the door before it was truly ready.

Ryzen may not be perfect, but it’s so much better than the FX-series processors that I’m almost willing to overlook some of the current warts. Besides, Intel is desperately in need of some competition in the CPU arena, and ARM SOCs just aren’t going to cut it. Hopefully by the time the Ryzen 5 and 3 parts start shipping, all the gaming performance issues will have been fixed. If not, I worry about the long-term prospects for Zen, because Intel isn’t standing still.

AMD Ryzen 7 Video Review Roundup:

Where To Purchase Ryzen CPUs:

AMD Ryzen Architecture – 52% IPC Increase, 4.8 Billion Transistors

AMD had initially promised a 40% IPC increase with Zen architecture but they managed to break the limit and went past that. The final product we know today as Ryzen delivers a 52% IPC increase. This makes the IPC of Ryzen chips better than Intel’s Broadwell and somewhat on par with Skylake chips. This is amazing and one of the major CPU architecture and performance gains that we have seen in the last 6 years. Not even Intel has managed to amaze in the CPU department as AMD have today which is definitely a thumbs up as it brings higher performance to the masses at a much affordable cost.

Furthermore, the Ryzen silicon packs 4.8 billion transistors which includes two million engineering hours and four years of hard workmanship. In comparison, Intel’s Broadwell-E chips pack a total of 3.4 billion transistors. The Ryzen architecture is built around a multi-year CPU roadmap and will be aimed at several market segments such as mobility products, HPC products and workstations.

AMD Ryzen 7 Series CPUs – Flagship AMD 7 1800X With 8 Cores, 16 Threads, 4 GHz Boost Clocks

The AMD Ryzen 7 range will feature the fastest “X” variant in the lineup. This processor will be known as the AMD 7 1800X and will feature 8 cores and 16 threads. This model is expected to operate at base clocks of 3.6 GHz and boost clocks of 4.0 GHz. The performance of this processor should be on par with Intel’s Core i7 6900K. Other details include an L2 + L3 cache of 20 MB (4 MB + 16 MB) and a TDP of 95W. The chip will have enthusiast level pricing at $499 which compared to Intel’s 6900K ($1000 US+) is a great deal.

The rest of the processors in the Ryzen 7 family are also 8 core and 16 threaded variants. The Ryzen 7 series has clock speeds ranging from 3.0 GHz up to 3.6 GHz. The processors include Ryzen 7 PRO 1800, Ryzen 7 1700X, Ryzen 7 1700 and Ryzen 7 PRO 1700. AMD Ryzen processors will feature a fully unlocked multiplier and can be fine tuned in real-time using the AMD Ryzen Master utility which we detailed here.

AMD Ryzen 7 Series Processor Lineup:

AMD Ryzen CPU Model Cores/Threads Base Clock Boost Clock L3 Cache TDP Socket Price
Ryzen 7 1800X 8/16 3.6 GHz 4.0 GHz 16 MB 95W-SR3+ AM4 $499 US
Ryzen 7 Pro 1800 8/16 TBD TBD 16 MB 95W AM4 $449 US
Ryzen 7 1700X 8/16 3.4 GHz 3.8 GHz 16 MB 95W-SR3+ AM4 $399 US
Ryzen 7 1700 8/16 3.0 GHz 3.7 GHz 16 MB 65W AM4 $329 US
Ryzen 7 Pro 1700 8/16 TBD TBD 16 MB 65W AM4 $299 US

AMD Ryzen Master Overclocking Utility Available Now For Download

AMD has officially launched their Ryzen Master overclocking utility which can be downloaded over here. The Master overclocking utility will offer full range of overclocking and tuning features to enthusiasts that include:

  • Per Core Clock Adjustment For All Ryzen Chips
  • Enable / Disable / Set Core Count (0/2/4/6/8 as per needed)
  • Step Size: +25 ~ +50 MHz increments for non-X and +100 ~ +200 MHz increments for X series chips (TBC)
  • CPU Voltage Adjustment
  • MEM VDDIO Voltage Adjustment
  • MEM VTT Voltage Adjustment (IMC)
  • VDDCR SOC (PCH Voltage Adjustment)
  • CAS Latency Adjustment
  • Row Precharge Delay (15 bus clock @ standard)
  • RAS Active Time (36 bus clock @ standard)
  • Read Row-Column Delay (15 bus clock @ standard)
  • Write Row-Column Delay (15 bus clock @ standard)

These are just the tuning options in the AMD Master control panel and there’s more. A sleek looking speedometer shows the peak speed your AMD chip would be operating at. It will indicate both the speed and temperature. The chip used for the showcase was operating at 3.9 GHz boost frequencies and idling around 2.20 GHz so temperatures varied between 40-50 degrees centigrade.

You can set clock speeds at a minimum of 3.00 GHz and a maximum of 6.375 GHz (LN2 maybe?) But that would mostly depend on the specific SKU you are getting and also the cooling used. You can save up to five custom profiles for your chip in the Master utility. The full Ryzen Master User guide is available over here.

New AMD Thermal Solutions

For Ryzen, AMD offers new thermal solutions based on the original Wraith coolers, launched to wide acclaim in 2016. The next evolution of Wraith includes Wraith Spire and Wraith Stealth, offering reliable, near-silent performance enthusiasts expect from the Wraith brand. Featured with Ryzen 7 1700 sold in retail boxes as well as many OEM systems, Wraith Spire offers superb cooling at an incredibly quiet 32 decibels.

Entire Range of AM4 Motherboards For AMD Ryzen Processors Pictured

The AMD AM4 platform will be based on the Promontory chipset which has five SKUs. These consist of X370 (enthusiast), B350 (mainstream), A320 (essential), X300 (enthusiast SFF) and A300 (essential SFF). AMD has planned a total of 42 new AM4 motherboards which will be available at launch through their board partners. The boards are detailed in our post here.

AMD AM4/TR4 Chipset Features and Specifications:

Wccftech X399 Refresh X399 Z490 X470 X370 B450 B350 A320 X300 A300
CrossfireX/SLI Quad SLI/CFX
(Max 6 GPU Support)
Quad SLI/CFX
(Max 6 GPU Support)
Triple CFX/2-Way SLI Triple CFX/2-Way SLI Triple CFX/2-Way SLI N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
PCIe Gen3 Lanes 60 (With Threadripper CPU)
4 Lanes Reserved for PCH
60 (With Threadripper CPU)
4 Lanes Reserved for PCH
16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU) 16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU) 16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU)
8 (with Bristol Ridge)
16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU) 16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU)
8 (with Bristol Ridge)
16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU)
8 (with Bristol Ridge)
16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU)
8 (with Bristol Ridge)
16 (with Ryzen 7 CPU)
8 (with Bristol Ridge)
PCIe Gen2 Lanes 8 PCIe Lanes (reserved) 8 PCIe Lanes (reserved) 8 Plus Gen 3*4 8 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe) 8 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe) 6 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe) 6 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe) 4 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe) 4 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe) 4 (plus x2 PCIe Gen3 when no x4 NVMe)
USB 3.1 Gen2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 0 0
USB 3.1 Gen1 13 (PCH+CPU) 13 (PCH+CPU) 10 10 10 6 6 6 4 4
USB 2.0 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 0 0
SATA 6Gb/s 8 8 6 6 6 4 4 4 2 2
SATA Express 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1
DDR4 DIMMs 8 8 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2
Overclocking
Support
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No
XFR2 Enhanced Yes No Yes Yes No Yes No No No No
Precision Boost Overdrive Yes No Yes Yes No Yes No No No No
NVMe Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Form Factor ATX, MATX ATX, MATX ATX ATX, MITX ATX ATX, M-ATX ATX, M-ATX M-ATX, Mini-ITX Mini-ITX M-ATX, Mini-ITX

AMD X370 / X300 For Enthusiast and SFF AM4 Motherboards

First up, we have the X370, a high-end chipset for overclockers and tweakers who need robust platforms. This chipset provides the ultimate low-level control to its users and delivers ultimate graphics card bandwidth. By bandwidth, AMD is referring to max PCI Express lanes as this is the only chip in the stack that supports multi-GPU functionality. The chipset supports both, CFX (CrossFire) and SLI. Features of X300 series chipsets include:

  • Dual-channel DDR4 memory
  • NVMe
  • M.2 SATA devices
  • USB 3.1 Gen 1 and Gen 2
  • PCIe 3.0 capability

AMD has mentioned two full x16 (Gen3) lanes for GPUs. AIBs can add additional lanes through a PLX chip but that would add to the cost. X370 features full overclocking support with a very sophisticated GUI that will allow the best overclock tools and experiences. Since all AM4 CPUs have an unlocked multiplier, record breakers will definitely put X370 boards to the test on liquid and LN2 setups. There’s also X300 which is the chip aimed at Mini-ITX boards featuring enthusiast grade designs. Boards based on this SKU will be available around mid-2017.

AMD B350 For Mainstream AM4 Motherboards

AMD B350 is the mainstream chipset and offers the most value in terms of I/O and functionality. This chip offers less lanes compared to X370 since AMD believes that most users don’t go multi-GPU in this segment. Aside from that, the chipset does retain overclocking support for all AM4 CPUs that will be offered in the future. This chipset replaces the 970 and A78 platforms. he AMD B350 chipset features 70% power reduction over its AM3+ predecessor (5.8W vs 19.6W). The latest DDR4 memory controller also offers 22% more bandwidth compared to DDR3.

Some general features of the AM4 platform is that it offers new I/O capabilities. We are looking at faster DDR4-2400 MHz memory, PCIe Gen 3.0, USB 3.1 Gen 2, NVMe and SATA Express support. These features have been missing on AMD platforms for a while but it’s nice that AMD is finally making a proper comeback with modern feature support.

AM4 Motherboards To Look Forward To (Image Credits: Videocardz):

MSI AM4 Motherboards Comparison:

Motherboard Name X370 XPOWER Gaming Titanium X370 Gaming Pro Carbon B350 Tomahawk Gaming B350M MORTAR A320M PRO-VD
CPU Support AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs
Form Factor ATX ATX ATX M-ATX M-ATX
Socket Type AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4
Power Phases 10 Phase 10 Phase 6 Phase 6 Phase 5 Phase
CPU Power Connectors 8+4 Pin (+6-Pin For mGPU Setups) 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin
DDR4 DIMM Slots 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 2 Slots (32 GB Max)
SATA III 6 GB/s Ports 6 6 4 4 4
PCI-e 3.0 x16 Expansion Slots 2 x16 / 1 x8 2 x16 / 1 x8 1 x16 / 1 x8 1 x16 / 1 x8 1 x16
PCI-e 3.0 x1 Expansion Slots 3 3 3 + 2 PCI Legacy Slots 2 2
M.2 PCI-e Expansion Slots 1 1 1 1 N/A
USB 3.1 Ports (External) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) N/A
USB 3.0 Ports (Internal / External) 2+4 2+4 2+2 2+2 2+2
USB 2.0 Ports (Internal / External) 3+3 2+2 2+2 2+2 2+2
Display Connections Display Port / HDMI DVI / HDMI DVI / VGA / HDMI DVI / HDMI DVI / VGA
Price $299 US $179 US $110 US $90 US $60 US

ASRock AM4 Motherboards Comparison:

Motherboard Name X370 TAICHI X370 FATAL1TY PROFESSIONAL GAMING X370 FATAL1TY GAMING K4 X370 KILLER SLI/ac X370 KILLER SLI AB350 GAMING K4 AB350 PRO4 AB350M PRO4 A320M PRO4
CPU Support AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs
Form Factor ATX ATX ATX ATX ATX ATX ATX M-ATX M-ATX
Socket Type AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4
Power Phases 16 Phases 16 Phases 12+2+1 Phases 12+2+1 Phases 12+2 Phases 9+2 Phases 9+2 Phases 9+2 Phases 9+2 Phases
CPU Power Connectors 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin
DDR4 DIMM Slots 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max)
SATA III 6 GB/s Ports 10 10 6 6 6 6 6 4 4
PCI-e 3.0 x16 Expansion Slots 2 x16 / 1 x4 2 x16 / 1 x4 2 x16 2 x16 2 x16 1 x16 / 1 x4 1 x16 / 1 x4 1 x16 / 1 x4 1 x16 / 1 x4
PCI-e 3.0 x1 Expansion Slots 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 1
M.2 PCI-e Expansion Slots 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
USB 3.1 Ports (External) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) N/A 2 (Type A + Type-C) 1 (Type-C) 1 (Type-C)
USB 3.0 Ports (Internal / External) 6 + 4 (Internal) 6 + 4 (Internal) 6 + 4 (Internal) 6 + 4 (Internal) 6 + 4 (Internal) 6 + 2 (Internal) 4 +2 (Internal) 4 +2 (Internal) 4 +2 (Internal)
USB 2.0 Ports (Internal / External) 2 Internal 2 Internal 2 Internal 2 Internal 2 Internal 2 Internal 2+2 2+2 2+2
Wireless Connectivity + Bluetooth Module Yes Yes + Dual Ethernet LAN Ports Mounting Included But Not Bundled Yes Mounting Included But Not Bundled N/A N/A N/A N/A
Display Connections N/A N/A HDMI HDMI HDMI HDMI / DVI / mDP VGA / DVI / HDMI VGA / DVI / HDMI VGA / DVI / HDMI
Price $209.99 $259.99 $159.99 $149.99 $139.99 $109.99 $99.99 $89.99 TBD

Gigabyte AM4 Motherboards Comparison:

Motherboard Name AX370 AORUS GAMING K7 AX370 AORUS GAMING K5 AX370 AORUS GAMING K3 X370 AORUS GAMING 5 AX370 AORUS D3 AB350 GAMING AB350 GAMING 3 AB350M GAMING 3 B350M D2 B350M D2
CPU Support AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs
Form Factor ATX ATX ATX ATX ATX ATX ATX M-ATX M-ATX M-ATX
Socket Type AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4
Power Phases 10 Phase 6+2 Phase TBD 10 Phase 6+2 Phase 7+1 Phase 7+1 Phase 7+1 Phase 7+1 Phase 7+1 Phase
CPU Power Connectors 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin
DDR4 DIMM Slots 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 2 Slots (32 GB Max) 2 Slots (32 GB Max)
SATA III 6 GB/s Ports 6 SATA III + 2 SATA Express Ports 10 SATA III + 2 SATA Express Ports TBD 6 SATA III + 2 SATA Express Ports TBD 6 6 6 4 4
PCI-e 3.0 x16 Expansion Slots 1 x16 / 2 x8 1 x16 / 2 x8 TBD 1 x16 / 2 x8 TBD 1 x16 / 1 x8 1 x16 / 1 x8 / 1 x4 1 x16 / 1 x8 1 x16 1 x16
PCI-e 3.0 x1 Expansion Slots 3 3 TBD 3 TBD 3 2 1 2 2 (+1 PCI Legacy Slot)
M.2 PCI-e Expansion Slots 1 1 TBD 1 TBD 1 1 1 N/A N/A
USB 3.1 Ports (External) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) 2 (Type A + Type-C) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
USB 3.0 Ports (Internal / External) 4+ 8 (2 USB DAC) 4+ 8 (2 USB DAC) TBD 4+ 8 (2 USB DAC) TBD 2+6 2+6 2+6 2+4 2+4
USB 2.0 Ports (Internal / External) 2 (Internal) 2 (Internal) TBD 2 (Internal) TBD 2 + 2 2 + 1 2 + 2 2 + 2 2 + 2
Wireless Connectivity + Bluetooth Module Dual Ethernet Ports Dual Ethernet Ports Dual Ethernet Ports Dual Ethernet Ports N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Display Connections HDMI HDMI TBD HDMI TBD DVI / HDMI DVI / HDMI VGA / DVI / HDMI VGA / DVI VGA / DVI
Price TBD $189.99 TBD $194.99 $149.99 $99.99 $109.99 $94.99 TBD TBD

ASUS AM4 Motherboards Comparison:

Motherboard Name X370 ROG CROSSHAIR VI HERO X370 PRIME PRO B350 PRIME PLUS B350M PRIME-A A320M-C
CPU Support AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs AMD Ryzen CPUs and AMD Bristol Ridge APUs
Form Factor ATX ATX ATX M-ATX M-ATX
Socket Type AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4
Power Phases 12 Phase 10 Phase 6 Phase 6 Phase 6 Phase
CPU Power Connectors 8+4 Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 8-Pin 4-Pin
DDR4 DIMM Slots 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 4 Slots (64 GB Max) 2 Slots (32 GB Max)
SATA III 6 GB/s Ports 8 8 6 6 4
PCI-e 3.0 x16 Expansion Slots 1 x16 / 2 x8 1 x16 / 2 x8 1 x16 / 1 x8 1 x16 1 x16
PCI-e 3.0 x1 Expansion Slots 3 3 2 + 1 Legacy PCI Slot 2 2 + 1 Legacy PCI Slot
M.2 PCI-e Expansion Slots 1 1 1 1 1
USB 3.1 Ports (External) 2 (Type A + Type-C) + 1 Internal Header 2 (Type A + Type-C) + 1 Internal Header N/A N/A N/A
USB 3.0 Ports (Internal / External) 2+8 2+6 2+6 2+6 2+4
USB 2.0 Ports (Internal / External) 2+4 2 Internal 2+2 2 Internal 2+2
Display Connections N/A DP / HDMI VGA / DVI / HDMI VGA / DVI / HDMI VGA / DVI / HDMI
Price $254.99 $159.99 $99.99 TBD TBD
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