Windows 10 Growth Slackens Amid Bugs, Privacy Concerns and Forced Updates

Rafia Shaikh
Posted Aug 22, 2015
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After a storm that Microsoft created with Windows 10 launch, seems like the initial hype is going down in flames. Offering a free upgrade to Windows 7, 8 and Windows 8.1 users, Microsoft has a goal of bringing Windows 10 to a billion users in the next two years.

Windows 10 adoption rate flattens:

New data coming from the analytics firms reveals that Windows 10 growth rate is slowing down from 6.6% on Sunday to 5.8% Monday. While Sundays have remained a peak download time for Windows 10 since the launch on July 29, the rate further came down to 5.7% on Wednesday, reports StatCounter. Rates have also slipped under 20% when week-over-week data is compared making last week the lowest since the roll out.

Since the launch, Windows 10 has remained a center for bug reports, driver issues, and privacy concerns more than the happy comments from consumers. Microsoft has tried to fix many flaws through the updates rolled out to the operating system. However, it’s nowhere near to the foolproof stage and has gained more criticism with its invasive privacy features which we will expand on some other time. Software bugs, compatibility issues, and various other reasons might have played a major role in early adopters going back to the earlier versions of Windows. There is, of course, the rush in downgrading process because Microsoft is only letting its users to downgrade within a month, possibly making it a strong reason users aren’t giving the new OS enough time to grow on them.

Some analysts are also including Windows 10 updates that Microsoft is pushing forcibly to users’ computers. While these updates might be including some essential bug fixes, they haven’t really been bug-free themselves. For some users, these update installations stopped midway among a plethora of other troubles.

Microsoft Releases Cumulative Updates to Windows 10 Anniversary PC Users

There are still many who will make the move to Windows 10 once they hear consistent good news about the new OS, see several of these bugs getting patched up and concerns responded by Microsoft. Add in the new machines from different OEMs that will come pre-loaded with Windows 10 and adoption rate will grow steady. However, it doesn’t seem anywhere close to what was earlier expected or even what Windows 7 achieved after its launch.

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