Windows 10 Creators Update Deployment Probably Won’t Be Complete Until Fall Creators Update Arrives Next Month

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Aug 24
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Released earlier this year, Microsoft removed the limits on the rollout of its Windows 10 Creators Update last month. This essentially meant that everyone was getting a notification to update their eligible Windows 10 PCs to Windows 10 Creators Update. With floodgates having been opened, it was expected that the Creators Update adoption rate would soar.

According to the latest stats released by AdDuplex, Windows 10 Creators Update went from 50 percent to 65 percent. While it’s not completely slow, it isn’t enough either. With this speed, the deployment of Creators Update probably won’t be finished when the Fall Creators Update arrives next month making it even more fragmented.

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Windows 10 Creators Update now powering two-thirds of Windows 10 devices

In comparison, Windows 10 Anniversary Update was powering over 86.3 percent of all Windows 10 PCs after five months of its release. The conservative Creators Update numbers also mirror the Intel Clover Trail Atom powered PCs that won’t be able to update to the Creators Update, as the Anniversary Update would be the last Windows 10 update for them.

AdDuplex added that the Surface lineup has started to adopt Creators Update more rapidly especially with Microsoft now offering Windows 10 Creators Update to the Surface Pro 3 users. Over 60% of Surface Pro 3 users are now running the latest Windows 10 version. Along with the Windows 10 adoption rate, AdDuplex numbers also reveal that Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4 is the most widely Surface device.

It is unclear why Microsoft opened the floodgates rather late in the Creators Update deployment process, making it a more fragmented release than the earlier versions. With all Windows 10 feature upgrades, the company has rolled out updates in multiple phases, ironing out compatibility and other system issues before large-scale deployment. However, even with this approach Windows 10 Anniversary Update brought with it a number of issues, including hardware incompatibilities.

Microsoft appears to be taking a much more conservative approach with the deployment of new releases at the risk of the Windows 10 ecosystem getting more fragmented with a number of different versions running at the same time. However, it does make the experience a little less annoying for end users who even report broken systems after some Windows 10 updates.

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