Razer Lachesis 5600DPI Mouse Review

Posted Aug 8, 2011
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Razer. Any true hardcore gamer would hear the name and would stop waliking in their footsteps. It’s that heart stopping of a brand today in the world of first person shooter games as well as MMORG platforms. As a matter of fact, all other major gaming peripheral makers such as SteelSeries, Zowie Gear, Cyborg; as the list goes on, all are competing against the snake branding giant. But most of them fail to leave their mark onto the current gaming community. That’s where Razer comes in.

In the past, we have reviewed many of Razer’s high end gamer peripherals. From the expert Ironclad mousepad to the FPS killer Imperator and MMORPG master Naga, all have been remembered for the ‘edge’ they give in a user’s gameplay.

As of today, I received another product from Razer at my doorstep. The Lachesis. Actually you can call it Lachesis v.2.0. Since the original Lachesis came with a 3G sensor that supports upto 4000dpi, this reimproved Lachesis comes with an improved and faster 3.5G sensor that takes it up to 5600dpi. Scroll down for the in depth review.

Specification:

To start off, the mouse as mentioned earlier, ships with a 3.5G sensor that boasts 5600dpi and Ultrapolling of upto 1000Hz with 9 Hyperresponse™ buttons so you wouldn’t miss a kill with the slightest distraction.

Internal

  • Light and Sound Effects at Startup and Shutdown
  • 5600dpi Razer Precision 3.5g Laser Sensor
  • 7 Hyperesponse™ Buttons
  • 1000Hz Ultrapolling™ / 1ms response time

External

  • Universal Design for both right and left handed use
  • Lighting changeable upto 16 million colors
  • Zero-acoustic Ultraslick™ Mouse feet
  • 7 Foot braided USB Gold Plated Cable
  • Approximate size:

 

Features

  • Ambidextrous design  that’s easy on the hand
  • 9 Hyperesponse™ Buttons
  • 3 Zero-acoustic Ultraslick™ mouse feet
  • Changeable DPI Settings from 800 to 5600DPI with a click of a button
  • On-the-fly Profile Change Button
  • Tron Themed Lighting & Sound effects at Startup
  • Infra-red 3.5 G Second Gen Laser
  • Plug and play support

Supported OS:  XP/Vista/7/Mac OSX

Packaging:

The Lachesis comes in a rather simple but intriguing rectangular box packing. The front flap is held by Velcro tape on the side that when opened, shows what’s stored inside. In this case, the Lachesis itself protected by a molded transparent plastic cover that holds the mouse securely inside.

The inner flap on the inside depict’s another image of the mouse itself along with a slogan ‘Bringer of silent death’. Let’s see later on if it sticks to what it says.

Taking out the mouse from the packaging, we find the usual Razer branded manuals inside a black flap cover secured behind the mouse packaging on a cardboard like sheet that has cuts made to hold the manuals with ease.

The papers inside the Razer branded flap includes a message from ‘RazerGuy’, a Quick Start guide, a product catalog, and two Razer logo stickers.

Closer Examination

The mouse is of an ambidextrous design and the second I grabbed it made my hand come in sudden ease as if my hand was suspended in the air. It gives you that good of a feel!

 

On the other hand, the mouse is styled along with a snake like look as if it’s silently waiting for its prey to come and waiting for the right moment to execute the kill.

The Lachesis comes with a braided USB 2.0 cord that also features a a gold plated USB connector.

The Razer logo slowly fades in and out in its default blue color when powered on even though the scroll light stays solid.

The best part about the mouse lighting is that this is one of the mice in Razer’s product line that will allow us to change its colors to up 16 million different colors of out own choice! That on the other hand requires us to download the Razer Lachesis Configurator from where this is all possible.

 The mouse has a total of 9 buttons (if you count the center scroll too). The two vertically placed buttons along the scroll wheel are for changing the DPI on the mouse from 800 to 1200, 1800, 4000 and 5600 DPI respectively. The default is set to 1800 DPI.

Besides the left and right click, there are two buttons each on the sides of the mouse. One side allows to switch forward and backward between your recently opened pages on a particular tab (in my case the pages I opened on one tab in Mozilla Firefox and Google’s Chrome browser). The other two are unassigned that can be set through Razer’s configurator.

Flipping the mouse over, we see 3 Ultraslick mouse feet, the 3.5G sensor and a ‘Profile Button’. This switch allows the user to change the pointing device’s profile without needing to go in to the configurator. They work offline too as once configured and saved via the configurator, they are stored onto the onboard memory on the mouse.

Insight of the Product

Design

The hold and feel of the Lachesis will make any pc gamer fall in love at first sight. The mouse is very comfortable to use. The matte nature of the mouse may be of a finger print magnet but can be easily removed with a swipe of a finger too.

None of the buttons get in the way of each other except the DPI change buttons that can possibly pose an issue for beginners to use this mouse as it comes directly under the middle finger.

Performance / Durability

In terms of gaming performance, this is THE bringer of silent death. It is a breeze to use when mixed with Razer’s own Ironclad hard mouse mat for both low and high dpi gaming and also comfortable to use with Zowie Gear’s G-TF Speed mouse mat, but that too on lower DPI settings (Above 1800DPI looses traction).

To give a fair comparison of somewhat, I brought out a Razer Abyssus that I have been using on my own pc. Even though the mouse tops out at 3500 DPI, I lowered the DPI on the Lachesis for an even match.

Being said that, the Lachesis still gave me the edge in all games I used it on (Make it Call of Duty: Black Ops, Battlefield: Bad Company 2, Counter Strike, Team Fortress 2).

In a sense of edge, it always gave me a smoother response. Even though the Abyssus and Lachesis come from the same manufacturer, use the same materials in build; the Lachesis felt as if I was drifting it on cream rather than a mouse pad. With none of the draw backs!

Software

For tweaking the Lachesis to some people’s own taste, we need to download ‘Razer Lachesis 5600 Configurator’ from Razer’s own website. The customizations for tweaking the Lachesis are almost endless. The software is very easy to use and provides various advanced settings up from the 16 million multi color lighting down to the independent X & Y axis settings for the 3.5G sensor.

Buttons Configuration

This area allows the user to change commands for each click/button on the mouse. Pretty much self explanatory.

Performance Tweaking

Under this tab in the configurator, we can tweak things starting from the number of profiles to show at the sensitivity stages to changing their individual DPI settings, acceleration per profile, even managing independent X-Y sensitivity on the mouse. The polling rate as well can be changed from the default 500Hz to a lower 125Hz or higher 1000Hz.

Profile Management

Import/export, make or delete profiles stored on the mouse that can be accessed by the ‘Profile Button’ underneath the mouse.


Managing Macro’s

This is pretty handy as you can customize your macro controls down to delaying each command by milliseconds.

Lighting 

This is the only mouse in Razer’s product line that currently offers changing the lighting colors on the mouse up to 16 million different colors! I found this personally very handy as I had kept the lighting on my Razer Marauder keyboard to red and so matched colors accordingly to my setup.

Conclusion

After 3 days of rigorous gaming and daily working with the Lachesis, I admit for once. This is something that comes out of the box as advertised. Bringer of silent death. Weight management doesn’t seem to be a requirement with this as it easily dances on any rough surface (newspaper, cardboard). It comes very handy and precise in terms of my daily work on Adobe Photoshop. This mouse, besides the Razer Tron we’re reviewed in the past, gave me that certain ease in all my work. No hiccups or any kind of drag. Just pure smoothness on every curve.

If you’re looking for a mouse that works both for left and right handed people, can change colors to match your lit-up keyboard, and off course kill off your enemies at ease while they’d respawn then look nowhere else. You’ve got Razer’s assassin working for you.

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