Cooler Master Xornet II Gaming Mouse Review

Keith May
Posted Mar 7, 2016
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Introduction

 

Cooler Master is bold enough to claim their Xornet II is, and I quote, “The best optical Gaming Mouse Design for Claw Grip”  Well…..is it?

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The Xornet II from CoolerMaster comes packaged in a sleek black box with a front flap that opens to show the mouse.  While this is, at its heart, a gaming mouse the packaging design lends itself to a more professional look.

The front of the box shows off the mouse and the fact that it supports full RGB lighting on the mouse wheel, since you can’t get away from RGB these days.

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The rear of the box has several sleek shots of the mouse as well as a feature set listed in 8 different languages.

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Hardware

Being that the Xornet II is designed entirely for Claw Grip you’ll find that it’s significantly small in height and length when compared to more common sized mice such as the SteelSeries Sensei and the Roccat Tyon.  It is however a bit wider to make better use of the side grips.

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The build of the Xornet  II is extremely solid and since it’s designed to be clutched like the prey of an eagle it has soft rubber side grips on either side of it so that it’s easier to grasp with your thumb and pinky.  They’ve even included a nice resting place for your ring finger so that it has something to do. Unlike most gaming mice the Xornet II isn’t slathered with features you’ll most likely never use, it however comes with 7 fully programmable buttons

  • Navigation buttons on the side
  • Right/left/center clicks
  • DPI selection

Included in those 7 buttons is the main Right and Left click that Cooler Master decided to equip with 5 million click rated Omron Switches.  On top of the mouse they’ve placed the Up/Down DPI selection buttons that come preset to 500/1250/3500 DPI.   While some have reported the Right/Left mouse buttons generating a squeak, after a week of use ours did not exibit this, perhaps it has been remedied with this latest revision.

But what does the DPI matter without a good sensor.  The Xornet II was designed around an Avago 3320 optical sensor with an adjustable DPI from 500-3500 and flanked on the front and back of the mouse are very large Teflon pads that make the movement of the mouse across a soft pad as slick as ice.

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Software

All of the adjustments to the mouse take place within the very lightweight but extremely difficult to read software from Cooler Master. Seriously, I get that the gray on black looks cool, but is a bit difficult to read.

Right off on the Main Control you have two options, one for OS Sensitivity for modification of USB polling rate from 125hz-1000hz as well as OS Sensitivity, Double Click Speed, and Button Response Time. The other tab gives you access to customize all 7 buttons to your heart’s content.

The LED tab allows you to assign color patterns to each DPI selection with full RGB as well as effects, allowing you to have a visual cue for each setting you make.

The Sensor tab gives you access to each DPI level selection for full adjustability as well as the ability to adjust the Lift Off Distance of the mouse to what suits you best.

 

Conclusion

With a MSRP of $34.99 it really is hard to find any fault with this mouse.  The biggest drawback would have to be its unique size and shape, as it will leave palm grippers feeling like their fingers are falling in front of the mouse.  I am, or was, a predominantly Palm Style gamer until using this mouse.  The sensor is responsive and never gave me any issues; I actually found my accuracy increasing immensely over my now retired Roccat Tyon.  The main Left/Right buttons were responsive but rather sensitive for those who wrest their fingers on the buttons may find themselves the occasional misfire.  The scroll wheel is smooth with slightly audible clicks when rolled quickly.  The DPI selection buttons are well placed and have a satisfying click to them, but the navigation buttons leave a bit to be desired with their spongy feel where the rest of the mouse feels solid.

Is this “The Best”? It’s hard to say, it’s good for sure.  But with peripherals being so subjective I can definitely leave this mouse with high praises and for its price point, it is absolutely worth a look.

 

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