Online Cheating Website Ashley Madison Gets Hacked; Millions Of Users Exposed

Omar Sohail
Posted Jul 20, 2015
69Shares
Share Tweet Submit

Oh dear; it appears that that the comprising of thousands of users’ personal credentials can take place at any time. On this occasion, a very large amount of data has been stolen from online cheating site AshleyMadison.com. To make matters worse, all the data that was stolen from Ashley Madison has been posted online by either an individual, or a group of individuals who claim that they have compromised every corner of the company, ranging from the users databases, financial records and other sensitive information.

Latest Statistic Shows That Ashley Madison Stolen Records Could Mount To 37 Million Users

According to the latest report, Ashley Madison, whose slogan is “Life is short. Have an affair,” had its data released by a team or a single individual that goes by the name of The Impact Team. The data stolen also came from databases that originated from Avid Life Media (ALM), a Toronto based company that owns Ashley Madison, along with related websites such as Cougar Life and Established Men.

According to the ALM Chief Executive Noel Biderman, The Impact Team did in fact execute the hack, but according to the executive, the company and its diligent employees were “working diligently and feverishly” to take down ALM’s intellectual property. Biderman was true to his word, because in a time span that lasted 30 minutes, several of the Impact Team’s Web links were no longer responding.

The hacker, or hackers, also leaked a number of properties owned by ALM, along with employee network account information, company bank account data and salary info. This is not the first time that a related website had its sensitive information leaked out in to the open. Less than two months have passed since hookup site AdultFriendFinder had millions of account information leaked out in to the open as well.

The Impact Team Also Decided To Tell The Public Concerning The Monetary Information Of Ashley Madison

According to the hackers, the full delete option present on Ashley Madison, which gives users the ultimate security when they want to purge their data is a lie because these details are not actually removed when users actually decide to delete their critical information. Given below is also a statement written by the group, or a single individual.

“Full Delete netted ALM $1.7mm in revenue in 2014. It’s also a complete lie. Users almost always pay with credit card; their purchase details are not removed as promised, and include real name and address, which is of course the most important information the users want removed.”

Additionally, The Impact Team decided to extort ALM by stating the following:

“Avid Life Media has been instructed to take Ashley Madison and Established Men offline permanently in all forms, or we will release all customer records, including profiles with all the customers’ secret sexual fantasies and matching credit card transactions, real names and addresses, and employee documents and emails. The other websites may stay online.” Too bad for those men, they’re cheating dirtbags and deserve no such discretion. Too bad for ALM, you promised secrecy but didn’t deliver. We’ve got the complete set of profiles in our DB dumps, and we’ll release them soon if Ashley Madison stays online. And with over 37 million members, mostly from the US and Canada, a significant percentage of the population is about to have a very bad day, including many rich and powerful people. Our one apology is to Mark Steele (Director of Security). You did everything you could, but nothing you could have done could have stopped this.”

ALM CEO Biderman has currently declined to tell exact information concerning the company’s investigation, but he does state that it could have been the work of either a former employee or contractor.

“We’re on the doorstep of [confirming] whom we believe is the culprit, and unfortunately that may have triggered this mass publication. I’ve got their profile right in front of me, all their work credentials. It was definitely a person here that was not an employee but certainly had touched our technical services.”

Leaked documents also suggest that ALM was aware that Ashley Madison and several related websites were at risk to be hacked. According to Trevor Stokes, ALM’s chief technology officer, he states the following:

“Security. I would hate to see our systems hacked and/or the leak of personal information.”

The company was currently in the search of investors for Ashley Madison that would allow it to file an IPO in London later this year. In order to accomplish this, ALM was hoping to raise in excess of $200 million. However, with this latest breach, future and current Ashley Madison investors will most likely be pulling out from their decision.

We will be posting more updates as more info become available to us. Stay tuned for more.

Share Tweet Submit