Dev: Sony Have Amazing Things Coming to PSVR; VR Needs More Than Tech Demos to Succeed

Alessio Palumbo
Posted Apr 12, 2016
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You might remember British studio Bulkhead Interactive from our coverage of Battalion 1994, the World War II FPS which had a very successful Kickstarter campaign gathering a total of £317,281 in pledges.

Bulkhead Interactive also recently announced The Turing Test, a first person puzzle game for PC and Xbox One.

Take control of Ava Turing, an engineer for the International Space Agency (ISA), and progress through a narrated story of introspection and morality whilst uncovering the hidden mysteries of Europa. Delve into The Turing Test’s human interaction puzzles and arm yourself with logical and methodical thinking. Take on tests designed in such a way that only a human could solve them. In an evolving story based on mankind’s inherent need to explore, protect and survive; players search deeper into Europa’s ice crusted core and transcend the line between man and machine.

The team is quite busy, then, but that doesn’t stop Executive Producer Joe Brammer in his relentless Twitter activity. Recently, he talked about the Virtual Reality topic stating that he doesn’t think it will be even a little bit successful until developers make expansive games rather than tech demos; he then added that Superhot is the only excellent VR game he played so far.

However, the most interesting tweet is certainly the one just below where Brammer mentions amazing things coming from Sony. With E3 2016 now getting closer, chances are we’ll see these games at Sony’s Press Conference.

That’s basically what IHS Technology’s Director of Games Piers Harding-Rolls said about a month ago:

Sony’s existing in-house expertise and third-party relationships means it is well positioned to build a strong body of content for launch of the platform.

Without a doubt, Sony Computer Entertainment has an advantage over its VR competitors (Oculus VR and HTC/Valve) as it has plenty of knowledge on how to provide a launch lineup, not to mention lots of internal studios capable of delivering proper games like the ones Brammer mentioned above. Indeed, the gaming industry needs to move past VR tech demos if it seeks to attract more customers; at the same time, it might be problematic to do so since longer VR experiences (such as full fledged games) have a higher chance to cause motion sickness and other similar issues to the user.

Ubisoft’s VR Games To Support Cross-Platform Play Across PSVR, Oculus Rift, and HTC Vive

What do you think, folks? Are you excited about Sony making full games for PlayStation VR? Tell us in the comments.

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