CCP Games CEO Says VR Won’t Be That Big of a Deal Next Year

Posted 1 year ago

The CEO of CCP Games, the maker of EVE Online and the upcoming EVE Valkyrie, had a conversation with VentureBeat and admitted that he didn’t quite think that VR was going to have as much of a large scale impact as we might think.

Hilmar Veigar Pétursson, CEO of CCP Games, doesn’t believe VR is going to rock the world as much as we might think.

Despite the fact that CCP Games is investing heavily in the future of VR by developing a game that fully integrates VR and all the elements that come with it, the CEO of CCP Games still doubts that VR will be quite the instant overnight success that the media might have you believe (us included).

“People tend to overestimate what we will accomplish in five years. But they tend to underestimate where we’ll be in 10 years.”

– Hilmar Veigar Pétursson

He further goes on to explain how other revolutions of technology took more time than we might have wanted, or than the developers might have wanted, before becoming true successes. The graphics revolution didn’t really begin to have a widespread effect until after 3Dfx was acquired by NVIDIA, which took far more than a year or two to become prolific.

“3D cards took six years to catch on, and phones took 10 years,”

– Hilmar Veigar Pétursson


In fact, VR in some form or another has been around for far longer than we might realize. The ever enthusiastic late Dr. Randy Pausch had a profound impact on the direction of VR simply by virtue of his relationship with Disney. But even before that his hand in VR started in 1998 when he founded his Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon which focused on visual storytelling in a virtual realm. 3D interaction was already a concept being explored, and realized.

Study Reveals More Gamers Intend to Buy VR Devices Despite Concerns Over Price and Motion Sickness

In fact, the innovations we see today stem from the research of Dr. Pausch and others nearly two decades ago, and likely inspired the latest revolution. Perhaps even John Carmack himself was influenced by Dr. Pausch and his human-computer interaction vision.

So Pétursson is certainly right that for any technology to become the norm, or to even become accepted, it takes time. VR is no exception, and has been fighting for a legitimate part of the consumer for the better part of two decades. The reality is that technology is just now becoming cheap enough to make it a reality.

CCP Games looks on their investment in VR as a long-term investment, something that they see the potential in, and they want to take advantage of the uniqueness of the platform and offer something great. That should hopefully spur more consumer adoption. There’s a tremendous amount of potential for an unbelievably immersive experience.

I personally believe that VR will have it’s place one day, but that it might not necessarily be ready for prime-time any time soon. The support and the cost of hardware, no matter the price tag, is prohibitive. Obviously there is little official support for VR headsets as none for the PC are officially released. That and the headset by itself may not necessarily be enough if not paired with the right human-interaction devices to make for a complete experience. But the possibilities are most certainly endless at this point.

What does everyone think of the coming age of VR? Are people excited about it, or is this something that might be similar to putting 3D in TV’s? Will this, too, pass?

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit