AMD FreeSync Capable Monitors Revealed at ‘Future of Compute’ Event

Usman Pirzada
Posted Nov 21, 2014
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As I am pretty sure you have heard by now, AMD recently held a ‘Future of Compute’ event in Singapore in collaboration with some major companies including Samsung and HP. The topic in focus for this particular post is their revelation of concrete information on FreeSync including upcoming models from Samsung. Availability of said SKUs will be around March 2015.AMD Freesync TechSpot Image

AMD FreeSync Demoed at ‘Future of Compute’ Event – Supported Samsung 4K UHD Models Revealed

Samsung has publicly expressed its intension to support FreeSync (Good luck to Nvidia trying to get G-Sync into Samsung monitors; now that they have started legal proceedings against the latter). The displays in question are the Samsung UD590 and UE850, and will come in variants of 23.6”, 28” and 31.5”. All are UHD (4K) displays so these will truly be beautiful to look at, even up close. AMD made sure to drive home the point that FreeSync is a completely free standard with no licensing fees and no closed source proprietary hardware. The monitors will support DisplayPort 1.2a. Our regular readers would realize why this particular property was a given anyways (DP 1.2a enables Adaptive-Sync which is a necessary requirement for FreeSync to function).

Once again, the fact remains that Adaptive-Sync capable monitors will be developed by third parties and the learning curve will be high the first time around. While I am certain they will be significantly cheaper than any G-Sync powered counterparts, I am also pretty sure these FreeSync capable UHD monitors will have a premium over Non-FreeSync capable units. The pricing on the UD590 (Non-FreeSync) is around $600, so you are looking at a price range upwards of $600 for a FreeSync capable 4K display. Interestingly, G-Sync supports only 30 Hz -144Hz while FreeSync supports 9-240Hz. I am not sure how that would equate in real life performance, but on paper Adaptive Sync seems to have an edge. Either way, only a real world, real scenario test can finally settle the debate once and for all (although I am pretty sure whichever side looses will disagree).

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